Brood Box Question

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by waski2, May 4, 2010.

  1. waski2

    waski2 New Member

    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hi,
    Total novice so I have many questions. My first one is I am confused about the brood box ( hive body)? Should there be one or more than one? If there should be more than one, when should the next one be added? How about over winter, should there be only one? If there is only one brood box could this be a problem?

    thanks for your time
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Only someone that is familiar with your climate can say how many. When starting, wait until the bees have raised enough young to cover 7 to 8 frames with bees. Then add the second box, whether for brood or honey.

    PS. The northwest doesn't give us much to go on. Change your profile to a closer area if you want answers that pertain to where you live. Otherwise, our truthful answers may kill your bees, as we will answer for our climate.
     

  3. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

    Messages:
    1,399
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    If you give them enough (but not too much) space as they grow, (as iddee outlined), they will take what they need. They do not care if the box is a deep hive body or a honey super. If they need a little extra room for brood, they will move up into the next box, regardless of what you or I intended to have in there. This is one of the reasons that I do not use a queen excluder. I just have to look carefully at the honey frames before I extract. (Note: I am just a hobbyist with 2 hives, and honey production is not my main focus.)
     
  4. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Brood boxes are not all created equal. Their sizes may vary from Jumbo depth (these are extremely large and extremely rare) to standard depth and now the somewhat common illinois depth ( which was once used almost exclusively as a honey super) is use for brood boxes.

    You can reduce your primary question to one easily handled by bee math. As in most math regimes you need to make a few assumptions. The first question you need to answer is the maximum egg laying level of the queen in the box. Then the approximate cells available for brood on one frame in the box (cells per sq inch X usuable sq. inch in a frame). Then the number of frames per box.

    To cut to the chase somewhat..... For most circumstances at the peak of the season one deep of a standard langstroth hive will allow sufficient room if the hive does not start to back fill the brood nest <certain beekeeper manipulations may limit or increase this possibility. I like to set up hives with one deep and one medium depth super (illinois depth) as a spring and summer time brood nest. As a general observation the further north you move the more likely you are to notice a double deep configuration taking the place of a story and a half.