Buckfast vs All American

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Zookeep, Sep 29, 2011.

  1. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    both queens are from R weaver, both seem to be laying good, buckfast building up a bit faster but its the color dif I cant get over, the hives are about 100 feet apart
     

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  2. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    Re: Buckfest vs All American

    sorry for the bad pics, holding frame with 1 hand camera in the other lol these are the 2 hives I started off the trap-out I started last week of july
     

  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    Re: Buckfest vs All American

    simply looks like two different aged comb to me... one slightly old and one almost new. given a bit of time picture 2 will look exactly like picture 1.

    a fair evaluation of the two queens based on the two pictures would be (I am assuming these are new queens and you are subject to some kind of current flow) in picture one the brood pattern is fair or average... in picture two somewhat less than average.
     
  4. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    looks like there must be some sorta flow on, hatched cells are being used for storage before queen can make it back to lay. The both frames, looks like more sealed honey across top of frame and always there is honey stored in upper corners, but storing honey/ nectar creating a barrier that she may not be inclined to pass, ( assuming your using double brood chambers ). understand is approaching end of the season, and winding down on the brood rearing is commencing.
    Barry
     
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    Barry writes:
    looks like there must be some sorta flow on, hatched cells are being used for storage before queen can make it back to lay.

    tecumseh:
    there does appear to be honey stored in those cells but this has nothing to do with whether the cells have hatched. the empty cells (only one click away from being termed shot gun brood) suggest the queens are somewhat inbred and the empty cells are simply where the larvae have been canalbalized(sp?) due to a lethal sex allele combination. in a long term dearth (as we have recently experienced here) you could see something like the same pattern but the poor pattern is due to diet deficiencies and not genetics.