Buckwheat?

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by tecumseh, Aug 19, 2010.

  1. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    No I am not looking for the character from 'Our Gang' but the crop that produces buckwheat honey and buckwheat flour.

    I am interested in information from anyone who has grown or though of cultivating buckwheat. I have the following three question (but don't let that slow ya' down brother answer some I haven't asked).

    1) what season do you plant buckwheat and how long does it take for the flowers to set?
    2) what is the seeding rate/acre?
    3) where do you acquire seeds?
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    And do deer and other animals eat it?
     

  3. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

    Messages:
    1,399
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I'm no expert, as I only planted a tiny patch last year. It is my understanding that buckwheat grows quickly, and you can plant early or late to get a crop, or double it up with another crop. From what I have read, it takes about 3 weeks to flower, and about 2 months to mature. The details all depend on your growing season and the conditions.

    As for seed, you can buy on-line for an outrageous cost, or hopefully you can get it at your local grain supply/ feed mill for closer to 60 cents/lb.

    I never had anything eat my little patch, and it was away from the house, behind the barn. Lots of critters walked through it, though. The soil there was bad... dry, rocky, well-established field grass, and packed down by vehicles... and the patch did okay, but not really well. I must have timed it badly, though, because I never saw a honeybee in it.
     
  4. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

    Messages:
    3,276
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Tec. i have planted buckwheat for several years (have two plots going now). Plant early spring after last frost date (frost will kill it) i plow and disc the ground and use a hand crank seeder to broadcast the seed and either walk back and forth or set on the tailgate while the wife drives back and forth (redneck style :mrgreen: ). It is best to run the disc or rake on it in after you broadcast it (birds will find it) but you don't have too. After it sprouts it will bloom in 26 days for atleast two weeks,when it goes to seed (50% or more of it has a hard seed on it) i run the brush cutter over it slowly and then disc it in lightly. Most years i can get three blooms from one planting this way. I buy my seed at the MFA feed store here and pay somewhere around $35.00 or $45.00 for a fifty pound bag, i can get a good coverage on an acre with fifty pounds. Jack
     
  5. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

    Messages:
    3,276
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Another thing deer will eat it to the ground, makes a good food plot for wild life. :thumbsup: Jack
     
  6. Mama Beek

    Mama Beek New Member

    Messages:
    1,053
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Jack, would you happen to know the easiest way to harvest that buckwheat for making flour??
     
  7. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

    Messages:
    3,276
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    No i don't for small plots, but i'm glad you ask. I have a hand crank grinder for making flour and corn meal and would like to grind some myself, i love those buckwheat pancakes mom use to make.Hummm i wonder if we could put the seed heads in a burlap sack and beat it with a (stick or board) like we use to do dried beans and lay a tarp or sheet on the ground when there is a good breeze blowing and hold the sack up high over it and dump it out, the heavy seeds will fall straight down and chaft will blow away. MamaBeek, you brought back some old memories and hard work, thanks :lol: Jack
     
  8. BeeHunter

    BeeHunter New Member

    Messages:
    222
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I'm on my second planting this year(about July 4th) after my garden didn't do so well. I did like Jack, disced and boadcast by hand. I am irrigating to get a good start on it and its growing fast. I am using it for 2 things, bee's and ground cover/tilthe. I hope to get another planting this fall but not sure if I'll get a bloom or not. The deer dont seem to bother mine but my patch is a little closer to the house than Jack and I have 2 Rottwiellers running around my spread. I r ead someplace that buckwheat seeds are hulled before ground for flour. Heres a link to more info http://extension.missouri.edu/publicati ... px?P=G4306
     
  9. cow pollinater

    cow pollinater New Member

    Messages:
    143
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I've grown some buckwheat but it's usually in a mixed planting with clovers and grass. It is best used by itself as a smother crop. I've found that the best bang for the buck is a later planting as it loves hot weather and doesn't germinate as well in the cooler part of spring. Around here the bees only use it for about an hour a day.
    The best/easiest place to buy farm seed in medium sized bulk quantities is Territorial Seed in Oregon. They won't kill you on price, they ship cheaper than anyone that I know of, and everything they sell germinates and grows fairly easily.
     
  10. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    thanks everyone for the quick reply and the detail. I though afterwards I should have asked for seeding rate but Jack jumped right in there and answered my unasked question already.

    thanks folks...

    your the best...
     
  11. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

    Messages:
    1,399
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    But... you DID ask for seeding rate! (Question #2) Oh, boy, tec's mind is finally going... :D
     
  12. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

    Messages:
    3,276
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Come on now Hobie, the hot sun, drought and to many stings to the noggin can work on a fellow. :lol: Jack
     
  13. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

    Messages:
    1,322
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Buckwheat is a morning nectar bearer, and ceases to produce later ni the day. Be advised when it produces nectar can be a prolific nectar generator, but when the plant ceases in the early afternoon--the bees will be irritated that they lost thier nectar source and you may pay if your working them. :)
     
  14. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hobie writes:
    tec's mind is finally going..

    and Jack responds:
    the hot sun, drought and to many stings to the noggin

    tecumseh replies:
    gone and thanks for the excuse Jack.