Building Boxes

Discussion in 'Building plans, blueprints, and finished projects' started by Capt44, Aug 23, 2013.

  1. Capt44

    Capt44 New Member

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    When building Hive Boxes using the Langstroth style remember these deminsions.
    All boxes whether a 5 frame Nuc or up to a 10 frame Boxes are 19 7/8 inches long.
    The long board for box joints are cut 19 7/8 inches and for the Rabbet Joints are 19 1/8 inches long.
    The short boards lengths are 16 1/4 ,13 3/4- 14, 11 1/2 and 9 1/2 for 10 frame, 8 frame, 6 frame and 5 frame.
    When using rabbet joints cut a rabbet joint 3/4 x 3/8 inch deep on each end of the short boards.
    When joined with the long boards the box will be 19 7/8 inches.
    The Depth of the boxes are: Deep 9 5/8, Medium 6 5/8 and Shallow 5 11/16 inches.
    I glue all joints with Tite Bond II glue and brad nailed. 2122_deepsuper__92522_std.jpg mediumsuper_std.jpg
     
  2. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

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    That gives the standard inside dimensions which is the most important. It would be good to mention that these dimensions only work out right if the lumber is very close to the 3/4" thickness of most planed boards. (Edit; I see you addressed this on another thread)

    Nice looking boxes; do you use a metal frame rest?
     

  3. The Bee Guy

    The Bee Guy New Member

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    No I just use the rest that is cut into the board which is 5/8 inch x 3/8 in.
    On the 8 frame box width there isn't a set standard for the width.
    I've seen 14 inches and 13 3/4 inch.
    I use 14 inches unless someone wants the 13 3/4 inches.
     
  4. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Capt44 welcome to the forum! Your knowledge and experience will come in handy to answer questions from members wanting to build their own equipment. How automated and specialized is the equipment you use for manufacturing equipment?
     
  5. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Greetings on joining the POSTING end of the forum. :hi:
    All members are welcome, but posters even more so. Those pictures show you to be a top notch "woodman". I hope your families of bees look as good as the equipment you put them in. :thumbsup:
     
  6. The Bee Guy

    The Bee Guy New Member

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    Yes, it depends on where the lumber is milled.
    You can have a bundle of boards that are planned to 3/4 inch thick but the next batch may be 13/16 inch thick.
    Which can lead to problems if you set up for the offset of the thickness.
     
  7. The Bee Guy

    The Bee Guy New Member

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    I use mostly planned lumber but can plane my own.
    I use a radial saw to cut my boards square.
    My table saw is a Porter Cable.
    I use a 10 inch ripping blade (80T) and a set of 8 inch dado blades for the frame rest and box joints.
    For the box joints I use a Jig made by Carl Korschgen in Columbia, Mo.
    I can cut box joints in enough boards for 4 boxes in 10 minutes.
    For the rabbet joints I use a 3/4 dado setup making a 3/4 inch x 3/8 inch cut.
    All of my box joints are 3/4 inch.
    I use a digital caliper to gage the thickness of the lumber and to check the width of the dado blades.
    My screened bottom boards are made from 2x4's with the dado cuts made into the board.
    It makes for a very solid foundation for the hive which can get heavy.
    The only thing I use a router for is making a 1/4 inch cut in the boards for the inner cover which is vented.
    The top is framed with 3/4 inch x 3 inch boards and topped with 1/2 inch plywood covered with aluminum flashing.
    I paint all hives with a White Flat Latex Paint with at least 2 coats.
    All wood pieces are glued with Tite Bond II and brad nailed.
    The metal for the top is held in place with 1/4 inch crown staples that are 3/4 inch long.
    After you build a few things get faster.
    I keep notes on every detail of building a hive so I can go back to it as a reference.
    So far this year I have built around 100 or so hives and around 400 boxes of different sizes.
    For frames and foundation I usually buy them, and put them together here, for they take up a lot of time.
    For instance just the top bar alone has 14 cuts on it.
    Here's a Hint on equipment, Anything above a 1/2 inch cut with a Router, use a dado blade on a table saw.
    I have had two 3/4 inch router bits break at the shank just below the bit from stress.
    Believe me you don't want a 3/4 inch bit bouncing around at 25,000 rpm.