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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Have been building my own screened bottom boards and hive bodies and supers. Now starting my inner covers with entrances and feeder holes and top covers.

Prototype inner cover with entrance/exit.

Wood Table Gas Electronic instrument Workbench

Top cover prototype sitting on top of inner cover with entrance.

Rectangle Wood Cabinetry Gas Machine

I want to be able to feed through the inner cover. I want to us the round piece of cut out as a plug for when
I am not feedeing. Also trying to come up with a way I can use a screen instead of the plug when I need some extra ventilation.

Glasses Table Wood Tableware Drinkware

I am thinking of putting a screen over this hole on bottom side of board so when I remove the jar the bees stay in. Do you think the bees could still get to the food with the screen over the whole. The jar would sit on the screen.

Table Furniture Wood Tableware Rectangle

Finished product. with a medium super box. Now I can just add the top cover.

Wood Rectangle Table Material property Hardwood

Any suggestions/ improvments are welcome.
 

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Hi, seems it came out good. However I am not a fancier of feeding in jars. I build my own hives and cut a 4cm diameter hole in the middle of the inner cover; over this I use this type of hatch





and a shallow tray feeder. With this type of feeder the bees have access to the food but will not fly out hen you open the large cover to feed them.

 

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a snip...
I am thinking of putting a screen over this hole on bottom side of board so when I remove the jar the bees stay in.

tecumseh:
I myself would not do this... you face the prospects of a leaking feeder if the distance between the holes in lid and the screen are too close.

the disc looks like a cool idea.... I assume you attach this thru the center hole to the inner cover?
 

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I use the same type feeder as Mosti.
I would think if you put the round cut-out piece back in when not feeding, the bees would propolize that in there pretty solid and it might be difficult to remove.
Nice to be able to do it yourself. :thumbsup:
 

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I use the same type feeder as Mosti.
I would think if you put the round cut-out piece back in when not feeding, the bees would propolize that in there pretty solid and it might be difficult to remove.
Nice to be able to do it yourself. :thumbsup:
Infact that was my first thought, propolizing. The disc is a very cheap and simple system. It is screwed onto the inner cover (not excessively tight so that it can turn manually) and rotated as need be.
 

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Looks good! It seems there are so many different ways to feed. I feed with a 2 quart jar set off to the side of the opening in my inner cover. Worked well for me.
My first thought over all of the boxes you made was an aesthetic one. I'd have the end grain facing the sides rather than the front. This doesn't do thing for the strength of the box. Just better to my eyes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Mosti,
Do you have a picture of one of you covers with the disk mounted? And where did you get the disk and that feeder.

Papakeith.
I did notice that as well and am planning on fixing that on the next boxes.

Does anyone know of a good place to get the metal for the tops. They have a roll of Galvanized flashing at Lowes. Its
20 inches wide and 10 ft long.

THanks everyone, this is good stuff.
 

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Are there ants in Arkansas? Without access to the area between the inner and outer lid, they will build a nest and use the hive for a pantry, eventually killing the hive. I would suggest a 3/8 in. rim on top of the inner lid. If the bees can access that area, they can keep the ants out.

I'm talking about when the feeder isn't being used and there is only the inner and outer lids.
 

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I just bought a roll of the 20" aluminum flashing and it worked out pretty good.

Turn your inner cover over, this will give your bees space to come up through the hole in it and walk to the cut out in the rim. Slide you outer cover so that the cut out in the rim is now open to the outside, now you have a top entrance and the bees can access the very top for house keeping. There should be bee space between the top bars and the bottom of the inner cover also.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Mosti,

Where do you get these 2 items. The metal hatch and that feeder. I have searching the net and have not found either one yet.

Thanks
 

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Iddee warning should be heeded here.

I myself have any number of migratory tops with the same kind of feeder. works real well.... easy to place on a new bottle, limits robbing to almost zero and is available to the cluster no matter what the weather (or air temerature).

I use a old jar lid (typically of the one piece design) to close up the hole when I am not feeding.
 

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You're right Marbees, that is the only complaint I have with the round feeders, not enough volume so it requires more trips (not that I need an excuse to visit my hives) :mrgreen:
Those ones in the UK look good, but might be a little pricey, looks like that would end up over $20 plus shipping and taxes.
 

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Inner Cover Design

For info.

The inner covers/crown boards sold in the UK have two feeder/Porter escape holes ---- one central and one off-set. The off-set hole is useful if you need to feed a small colony that is off to one side of the hive. When not in use, I cover the hole(s) with a small piece of bee proof perforated zinc or expanded aluminium mesh held in place with thumb tacks. I know of beeks who use a piece of ceramic tile or slate to close the hole.
 
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