Bumble bee in hive

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by bamabww, Aug 26, 2012.

  1. bamabww

    bamabww Active Member

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    On a casual, walk around inspection last Friday I noticed a bumble bee going in the top of one of my hives. I have had the top cover elevated on the front side to allow a little more ventilation during the brutal heat of the past summer and have not yet let them down.

    The bumbler landed on the hive body just below the elevated top cover and made its way thru the access hole in the inner cover.

    I thought that was interesting and wondered what I was going to do if that became a problem. I went on and checked my other 3 hives and then got my veil and went back to the first hive the bumbler was visiting. I was kneeling down looking up into the bottom of the top cover and saw the bumbler rear end at the access hole. I removed the top cover and my bees were pushing the bumbler out. They had killed it and were removing it from the hive. I watched and they finally pushed enough to send him falling to the ground below.

    I covered them back up and left well enough alone. Anyone ever have bumbler problems ?
     
  2. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Not Bumble but then they are from relatively small colony's and they would only be after the honey and maybe pollen earlyer in the year. Wasps, yellow jackets, hornets, and even ants, on the other hand will take the bees brood and honey and can totally decimate hive in a couple of days
     

  3. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    I have HIVE WOODWARE problems from a local wood-burrowing species of bumble bee. The females love to burrow tunnels in the wooden walls of the hives, where they lay their eggs and raise their next generation. A lot of my stored hive bodies have been totally ruined by their burrows.:ranting:
     
  4. srvfantexasflood

    srvfantexasflood New Member

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    Doesn't sound like you have much of one.
     
  5. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    I have had bumbles in my hive (more so in the spring). Some go in and come out unmolested, others are killed and dumped outside. I'd say even if the odd one manages to rob some honey it's not what I would consider a problem.
     
  6. bamabww

    bamabww Active Member

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    Agree, didn't say I did.
     
  7. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    Good for your soldier bees...It would have been interesting to watch the battle...National Geographic material for sure...
     
  8. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    We see a LOT of national geographic material upclose and firsthand!
     
  9. srvfantexasflood

    srvfantexasflood New Member

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    Found a very large bumblebee,very dead, laying in front of one of my hives last night, too. I guess I joined the club as well. I had never seen any bumblebees try entering before. I watched my bees shoo a butterfly away once.
     
  10. Tia

    Tia New Member

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    Yeah, I've found them dead in the hive. Usually my girls remove any detritis and most times fly the bodies away--very hygienic sweeties--but I guess bumbles are too heavy to do that with, so I find them inside the hive. At least one every year.
     
  11. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    It's interesting to see how the bees, when unable to remove an invader they've killed in the hive, coat it with propolis.
     
  12. mdunc

    mdunc New Member

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    The other day while doing a hive inspection I had a big ugly European Hornet swoop down and take a bee right off the frame I was holding. Looked like a hawk swooping down after a rabbit. It left me just standing there kinda dumb founded.:eek:
     
  13. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Watch at the entrance cause they will attack a hive and take bees brood and honey in a very short time. If they are coming to the hive reduce the entrance. Hang up traps to try and reduce there numbers. They tend to attack the weaker hives and nucs first then move onto the stronger hives. Once they get started hornets, yellow jackets, and wasps from multiple nests will work together to attach a hive.
     
  14. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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  15. Tia

    Tia New Member

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    I found a propolized bird once!