Bunch of Newb Questions

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Buckeye, Sep 3, 2012.

  1. Buckeye

    Buckeye New Member

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    Is it possible not to get stung? I was looking at the Ultra Breeze suits and was thinking about wearing a light pair of carhart bibs under it.. I'm just worried from seeing youtube vids of guys getting stung through their suits and the sting stories I see on here.. I absolutely hate getting stung by bees and don't mind be uncomfortably hot if it will help prevent getting stung. The hive location would be on my deck, Im going to have to fence it in with cheap wood fencing to keep my dogs out. They love barking at animals underneath the deck, do you guys thing the bees would fly over the fence to attack them? The deck is around 30'x30'. Another concern is the hive would be on my deck close to my house, are they going to try to take up residence inside and I'm I going to be dodging flying bees in my yard all the time? Last one is what are some good starter kits out there? Thanks for any help..
     
  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    First, let me Welcome you to our friendly forum. You have found a great place to hang out, learn, and ask questions.

    If you are going to keep bees, you are going to get stung. It goes with the territory.
    What you can do is minimize the chances as much as possible. I have an Ultra Breeze suit that I started wearing this year and I have yet to be stung through it. I have been stung on my hands, head (when I forget to zip the veil), again on the head when I unzip the veil when I am done and walking away, when I get in the truck and don't realize I have a "passenger" riding on me, etc. Sorry the news isn't better, but you will come to realize that it isn't as bad as one can make it out in their own mind. Really!

    Sounds like you have a fairly large deck. If you build your fence with a decent perimeter around the hive itself (a few feet on at least 3 sides) the dogs shouldn't be bothered (more than once). :wink: Make sure the fence is high enough that the bees must go up over head height when they leave and for the most part you will be unaware of them in the rest of your backyard.
    They are unlikely to take up residence in your house if you manage them properly.
     

  3. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Yes, you will be stung.

    Now, honeybees are NOT wasps nor yellow jackets. They hurt. Comparatively, honeybees don't. I get stung quite often and don't even notice it until I see the stinger. Other times, it's like a mosquito bite. Unless it is on a very tender spot, like your lip or next to the eye, it's not nearly as big a deal as you think it will be.

    If the entrance/exit is at the deck's edge, away from the foot traffic, you will never notice them. As for the dogs, most will learn after one visit.
     
  4. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Welcome to the forum :hi:

    You got some good advice in the above two post.

    If you have ever been swimming I am sure you got wet, and if you are going to play with stinging bugs..................well guess what, you are going to get stung. Not trying to scare you off from keeping bees but after a while you will come to expect it and not mind it too much.

    Not sure why the bees would want to take up residence in your house, unless it is a greenhouse full of blooming flowers and then they are only coming for a visit.
     
  5. Noronajo

    Noronajo New Member

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    Sadly, some people never get over their fear of being stung-no matter how minor the sting reaction. I have a severe local reaction, huge swelling and feverish, even broke out in hives when I didn't remove the stinger promptly. My husband can't even tell for sure where he got stung a few minutes later but I caught him standing at the patio door 2 days ago in his underwear clutching a flyswatter. He was staring at his jeans lying outside and cautioned me to go out the front door because he had a bee on his jeans and it wouldn't leave.
     
  6. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    :lol::lol: Tough guy eh?!?!

    Reminds me of a story another keep tells, one of the gals around here that is commercial got a bee in her pants. He says all he can remember is some yelling to turn his head, blue panties and some of the whitest legs he has ever seen headed for the brush!
     
  7. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Welcome We all start out afraid of the unknown. bee stings are going to happen and until you discover the severity of the reaction you are going to have to stings it can be unnerving the thought of being stung. Most beekeepers after their bodies build up an immunity and the antibodies to tackle the foreign proteins from a bee sting have little to no reaction.
    The dogs will nip at the bees till they learn to respect them, but the bees will not actively pursue them. And as Perry said fence to divert them over head. or so their entrance is facing towards an unused portion of your and your neighbors yard
     
  8. heinleinfan

    heinleinfan New Member

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    Welcome to the forums, Buckeye.

    I have no experience with bee suits, I just kinda take my lumps when I get them, and just bundle up in 2 tough layers if I'm doing something I think will rile them up (like moving a hive).

    I have heard from keepers before, though, that having a suit helped them not get stung, but not just because the bees couldn't get through it. They said they felt more secure and comfortable in the suit, not so stressed or tense or jumping at fly-by bees, so their inspections were always a little more calm and peaceful.

    I've not been super excited by starter kits I've seen from the major suppliers. They always seem to have too much extra stuff or are missing something important. Check in your area for a bee club or association; some clubs get together in winter or early spring and make bulk orders and share shipping costs and sometimes local clubs have a supplier they have deals with for good prices and you can pick your own stuff.
     
  9. Noronajo

    Noronajo New Member

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    He even admits it doesn't hurt all that much-it's just a visceral reaction and I just try to keep him out of the line of fire. As for" bees in your pants dance"- I know that one. Ran all the way to the house before shucking them-you never know who has their camera phone!
     
  10. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    Welcome to the forum. I entered my first year of keeping this year sure I would be careful enough to avoid any stings. I have received 3 stings so far. 2 of them I was not wearing a suit/veil. The 3rd time was through my suit. I have a normal run of the mill bee suit. My reactions were less and less each time. I can tell ya I would rather get stung by 5 bees than one freakin sweat bee or wasp. Like the others said, I didn't realize had been stung until later. If you put the hive on your deck, understand the front of the hive will have activity similar to the day in the life of Fedex air http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F3TpKvsxqts&feature=youtube_gdata_player
     
  11. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Just remember "sweat goes down, bees go up!"

    Once you get over the fright (not a good word but all I could think of) of a bee buzzing you in the face or landing on you you will have the hardest part of beekeeping whipped. Not all bees want to sting you, too much hype by the media and cartoons. A suit, gloves and veil is just peace of mind and most likely after a couple of years of sweating it out they will slowly not be the first thing you reach for, but will always be within reach.
     
  12. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    what everyone else said about getting stung.... most dogs learn to avoid the girls when their tone gets angry... much like people some small number of dogs can experience an allergic reaction to bee stings (nothing hypothetical here I have seen this myself).

    and a snip...
    I was looking at the Ultra Breeze suits and was thinking about wearing a light pair of carhart bibs under it..

    tecumseh...
    the ultra breeze kind of suits are very bulky but reduce the chance of stinging to about zero even if you wore nothing but a tee shirt and shorts* underneath the suit. it is simply how they are made with multiple layers of material and the material itself doesn't allow any stingers to pull out and this highly reduces the level of attack pheromone. you do need to wear a hat since once you do begin to perspire the one spot that become an acceptable target is the top of your head. gloves can be a bit of a problem with the ultra breeze... also due to the bulk of the material it is just difficult to get the gauntlets of the gloves over the bulk of the material at your wrist.

    *you could of course chose to do the bee keeping thing nakid' like iddee but if you do please do not share any pictures here :wink: :wink: !
     
  13. ablanton

    ablanton New Member

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    Yeah, my girls jumped on my Boston Terrier one day. :lol: She broke out in welts and hives for a day. Did some serious wallowing on the carpet in an attempt to soothe the itching! She wouldn't go back to that side of the yard for a solid week! :rolling:

    Buckeye -- As for my experience with stings, the anticipation is much worse than the actual sting. I still wimp out on occasion and dodge or swat when I get charged. When one finally does pop me, it isn't near as bad as I was expecting. Bees aren't as aggressive as a lot of people think. I am too cheap to buy a suit or veil. I have only been stung 4 times this season. I do wear safety glasses so that I don't take a direct shot to the eye. I got popped above the eyebrow a few weeks ago and it wasn't too pretty. Didn't hurt that bad, but it looked horrible!
     
  14. Noronajo

    Noronajo New Member

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    Head sting reactions are not fun-eyes swelled shut a few weeks ago but I didn't even know I'd been popped!
     
  15. litefoot

    litefoot New Member

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    I am also in my first year beekeeping. One of my first stings was when a curious bee climbed in my glove. I overreacted and dropped a frame of bees on the ground. The bees were all angry and bombing me after that and I REALLY struggled mightily to get through the inspection. It was my first inspection with a full hive of bees; very stressful and very hot and I began to wonder if beekeeping might not be my thing.

    Since then, I've only been stung once on the hand; again while I was holding a frame of bees. This time, with some experience, I calmly flicked the bee off, layed the frame down and scraped the stinger out. Not very painful. No big deal. I just started going gloveless this past week. I am more amazed each week how well the bees tolerate my bumbling and fumbling without getting riled up. Neat creatures!

    All beekeeping equipment is about the same price wherever you decide to buy. Your job is to find the best shipping rate. So the very best option, for me, is to buy locally.
     
  16. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Buckeye--It looks like you have the whole forum in agreement---
    1. Everyone is happy you've joined the forum, as shown by their quick and serious responses. I add my "welcomes" to theirsl :hi: I hope we're not scaring you off with answers you hoped not to receive.
    2. There is no such thing as beekeeping without getting stung. No matter how well you protect yourself, sooner or later you've got to get out of your "uniform"---and there will be a stubborn bee with more patience than you, wating to show you her displeasure.
    3. As mentioned. stings come in all sorts of "flavors". Yesterday, working gloveless, I got two stings--one hurt for about five minutes and I forgot about it. This morinng, with no pain or itching or irritation to bother me, I discovered that my hand was slightly swolen. The second sting was barely felt. For the life of me, I can't even remember where it was, just that I got it.
    3. If your bees have flown over a fencing to get to the flowers or to return from them, they'll stay above the fence level. No chance that they'll go down to the level of barking dogs.
    4. Bees coming home late in the evening, might be distracted towards lighting inside the house and if the screens are open, they might be able to enter and gravitate towards the lights. Not too big a risk. If bees enter the house (by accident) during the day, open the doors and screens---they want out! I would suggest placing the entrance of the hive facing away from the house.
    5. I have no experience buying "starters' sets" for beekeepers, but suggest you reread Heinleinfan's comment on the topic (post #8).
    6. Again, I hope we didn't scare you off. You'll find that beekeeping can be a challenging, interesting, exciting and rewarding hobby. Don't pass it up. :grin:
     
  17. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    I have bees in a residential setting. They will not fly through a lattice, so I have a 6 foot high and 4 foot square cedar lattice around the hive. They spiral up, and by the time they start their bee line flight, they are out of "human space". I've been keeping bees since spring. I have put on my veil twice so far, at the end of somewhat lengthy hive inspections when the ladies lost their patience with me. When I have been stung it was because I squished a bee with my fingers while handling frames. Also once when I stuck a bee in my mouth with a chunk of honey comb. Otherwise, they are amazingly tolerant creatures. Bee stings hurt quite a bit for about two seconds, and then not that much. I work with my hands, and actually the bee stings have reduced the aching in my fingers.
     
  18. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    tecumseh said:
    the ultra breeze kind of suits are very bulky but reduce the chance of stinging to about zero even if you wore nothing but a tee shirt and shorts* underneath the suit. it is simply how they are made with multiple layers of material and the material itself doesn't allow any stingers to pull out and this highly reduces the level of attack pheromone. you do need to wear a hat since once you do begin to perspire the one spot that become an acceptable target is the top of your head. gloves can be a bit of a problem with the ultra breeze... also due to the bulk of the material it is just difficult to get the gauntlets of the gloves over the bulk of the material at your wrist.

    tecumseh has hit on a very interesting point here. It is the one thing that I have found that frustrates me. The wrist part of the sleeves are well made and fit nicely. They do not however, lend themselves well for any type of gauntlet glove! I have actually begun looking for a pair of gloves without the gauntlet part. I was using nitrile gloves (and ran out of them) and have been going gloveless as of late, but I know that at some point I will need a pair, and after trying to get the gaunlets over the suit I gave up.
     
  19. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    Welcome to the forum! Here is a pic of my dog. she always love to chase squirrels and butterflies but leaves the bees alone. Has not been stung yet! She got me stung one evening when I was looking at them close without a veil. She walked right in front of the hive wagging her tail and swooped a bunch up wagging and threw them in my face. One got me in the side of the head.
     

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  20. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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    And a belated welcome from another buckeye beek. Where are you in Ohio? Send me a pm with your particulars-if close enough, maybe we can get together.
    Unfortunately, I have to add the bad news to the rest of the family here on the forum. If you keep bees, you will get stung. After a few, you don't even notice them.
    Good luck.