Busy busy busy

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by me2pl, Apr 28, 2013.

  1. me2pl

    me2pl New Member

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    ugh. this is going to be a busy week with the bees, or really just in general.
    first off, we have this happening, which is great, but it is happening at a time when we just discovered a dead-out in a box that died last year of similarly mysterious causes (we suspect Foulbrood and are going to dispose of the box when we get a chance) and we have to keep our eyes on a baby swarm from Oliverez.
    this is all happening at a time where my father has found a bit of work (regrouting a friend's shower) and i have to do serious studying for school and it is my birthday soon.

    if you have any hints or tips on how to manage this would be great and if the admins wanna move this, that would be fine too.
     
  2. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Your studies should come first! When you have to stop for a mind-clearing rest, you can cover over the dead out to be attended to later, when you're not under pressure. If you're up to it then, you can try your hand at steriizing the dead out. It would be a shame to "total" the hive equipment. Remove the combs for burning and give the woodwork a scorching with a blow torch. As to the swarm--aw heck, it's only a baby swarm. forget about it. Get on with that important studying so you can show your parents your great grades as a birthdy gift to them.
     

  3. me2pl

    me2pl New Member

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    the plot thickens:
    the dead-out apparently still has viable brood in it, so it cannot be foulbrood. that still doesn't change the fact that we have had two separate hives die in that brooder due to mysterious causes. i may take some pictures and try to see what you think, but the idea is that there were some capped brood with little cracks in the cap, very few larva (if any) that we saw, maybe a total of 20 bees left, and several "emergency" queen cells that had opened. there was full super of honey on top, and another that they were drawing out still. the comb in the hive was really dark. the only other thing i can remember off the top of my head was that they had a small ant infestation.
    if you have any ideas as to what happened, please let me know
     
  4. CarrollwoodBees

    CarrollwoodBees New Member

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    I'm sorry to hear about the bee problems. But adversity makes us stronger, usually, and beekeepers are pretty tenacious as a group. I agree with efmesch--you have to invest in yourself today to insure a more secure tomorrow. Just think one day at a time, one chapter at a time, one test at a time, and before you know it, you'll have the tools to provide for your family. I know because it's what I had to do, too. Take care and good luck.
     
  5. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    what makes you think foul brood?
     
  6. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    like g3 said, what makes you think it was foulbrood, other than what you said? it would help us to help you, if you posted several photos and give us a little more description/history on this hive, and the queen. best wishes on your studies, and happy birthday......:grin:
     
  7. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    ants would have consumed the honey.

    what now make you think it is not foulbrood? usually with american foulbrood you will see sunken caps but it doesn't necessarily affect all the brood.

    are you talking about just reuse of the box or the box + frame?

    if it is just the box is there anything unusual about the box? is it painted or dipped?
     
  8. me2pl

    me2pl New Member

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    so here are some pics i finally took of the dead hive
    i forgot to mention that it was a 9-frame brooder, and they had made a 10th frame when we checked and discovered their death. i don't remember whether it was there 10 days earlier
    there are also pictures of some webs sitting in some cells, but i'm not sure how important they are, they could've been made by some spiders that rolled in afterwards.
    IMAG0840 - Copy.jpg IMAG0841 - Copy.jpg IMAG0842 - Copy.jpg IMAG0843 - Copy.jpg IMAG0844.jpg IMAG0845.jpg IMAG0846.jpg IMAG0847.jpg IMAG0850.jpg
     
  9. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    first off let me say me2pl something you likely already know which is.... no matter what everything that follows is a wild ass guess.

    secondly I would guess you are aware of the poisonous plants that might be in and or around Chico California???

    I can see nothing here that suggest either form of foul brood with the small holes in the capped cells appearing to have been generated by ants. some robbing appeared to have taken place but not so much as to think this was the primary cause or reason. the patchy nature of the brood areas does suggest to me some weakness in the queen or perhaps the onset of a significant case of nosema or perhaps varroa. a lot of time if I see sudden reduction in population and stores that appear to be left unused and unrobbed then I most often first think of nosema. it is my understanding however that California in particular has some poisonous, plants so you would need to think about that possibility first.
     
  10. me2pl

    me2pl New Member

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    what plants do you mean? i've seen small amounts of Vetch, but i've seen little else around our area
     
  11. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    check with the California beekeeper to make certain but I seem to recall California Buckeye as being one poisonous plant. here and to the east we can also have yellow jasmine which I think is not really poisonous but definitely make the bees quite weak. likely any of these with the wrong kind of spring weather could produce lethal results.

    I need to google Chico to see what kind of terrain you might have there.
     
  12. me2pl

    me2pl New Member

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    i know buckeye is deadly, but there is none in our area. we have a jasmine bush in our front yard but i thiiiink it's star jasmine
     
  13. me2pl

    me2pl New Member

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