Buy a Queen or let the Bees Make Their own Queen?

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by lazy shooter, Apr 26, 2013.

  1. lazy shooter

    lazy shooter New Member

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    I have one under performing queen that I am going to replace. I would like to replace her with a BeeWeaver queen, but they will not be available until late May or the first of June. There are other queens available now. So I could get an Italian Queen from Rweaver Apiaries over night, or I could pinch this queen and let the bees make their own queen.

    My question is: If they make their own queen, how long will it be before the queen is laying vs how long will it be before a purchased, mated queen is laying. I realize that in both cases the queen may take a bit longer than the programmed time to really set in a become a reliable layer.

    I do not have flow going at this time, and we not have a spring flow due to our continued drought.
     
  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    My rule of thumb is that it takes roughly 28 days for a queen to start laying if you let them raise their own.
     

  3. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Like Perry said, and another 21 days before you have new brood.If you decide to raise your own, i would take eggs from a strong hive and have the weak hive raise a queen from them if you have one. You don't want to raise a queen like the one you have. JMHO. Jack
     
  4. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    how about splitting off a small queen rearing nuc. Let them raise a queen while your main hive is still going. Then pinch the old one and combine.
     
  5. Daniel Y

    Daniel Y New Member

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    I would make a nuc to rear a new queen. the current one may be a dud but a little brood is better than no brood. The time it will take to rear a queen is about the same as it will take to get the one you want. Th hive will continue to decline in teh mean time. I woudl go ahead and order the new queen. when she arrives requeen your original hive. Allow time to make sure she will perform while transferring brood from the nuc hive to boost population back up to normal.

    Assumign the best and you end up with two acceptable quens you can then choose to start a second colony, pich the additional queen. or just keep adding her brood to the main colony and winter the nuc over. I see this as the minimal risk max recovery path. And you still get yoru Weaver queen without the wait causing additional problems. At least problems that cannot be corrected soon.
     
  6. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I would be careful about whom I purchased queens from...

    I heard a disturbing story today from a new beekeeper here about a package she purchased from a local source.

    all names with held to protect what appears to be 'the guilty'...

    not so oddly perhaps this reinforces something one of my prior mentors/employers told me long ago.
     
  7. CarrollwoodBees

    CarrollwoodBees New Member

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    I found that to be true, too. I just did that. At day 30, there were tiny larva, meaning she'd been laying for at least 4 or 5 days. But it's scary when there is no brood. You have to add a frame every week to keep the existing bees from laying drones. Then they have no foragers, so you have to feed them until they are 35 days old -/+. (21 days through pupa, plus 14 days until they forage). Gotta memorize the life stages--it's the answer to most questions.
     
  8. CarrollwoodBees

    CarrollwoodBees New Member

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    Amen to that, tecumseh
    ...