Camcote

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by PerryBee, Sep 4, 2012.

  1. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Has anyone ever used this product? It say it can be used right over galvanized metal and is clear. Is it actually clear? It might be a good way to restore an old extractor and halt any rust. Adam Foster Collins says it is almost impossible to find it up here. :sad:

    http://www.brushymountainbeefarm.com/Camcote-1qt/productinfo/615/
     
  2. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    Most of what I researched says it is good stuff to use. A lot of beekeepers use it. People in the maple syrup asked the same question and this is about sums it up.

    Be careful when something says "food grade." There are definitely paints out there that say food-contact, but when you look very deep into it you will find that they are typically listed as "incidental" food-contact, meaning, if something splashes onto them it's OK and won't poison the food, but putting food into "direct" contact with them is NOT allowed, and certainly having food stored in direct and "prolonged" food contact is not good.

    Most epoxies that are truly food-grade are not meant for non-professional application. They are often quite toxic (take the correct precautions if you do use any of these products), or require special curing procedures (baking) to fully dry and harden. I suspect that's what any of you who've used this product has found......it'll scuff off pretty easily, and if you get it too thick, it'll probably never fully harden. Stuff like this is meant to be sprayed into the inside of tanker trucks and then the tanks are baked in a huge oven at several hundred degrees for hours to cure them. Not likely you're going to do that.
    Last edited by DrTimPerkins; 04-23-2010 at 07:48 PM. ​
    Dr. Tim Perkins
    UVM Proctor Maple Research Ctr
    http://www.uvm.edu/~pmrc

     

  3. Walt B

    Walt B Active Member

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    A friend kept bees years ago and he gave me an old four frame galvonized extractor. I used Camcote on all of the tank surfaces and gate...after I thoroughly cleaned it and removed any rust. As I recall, I gave it a couple of thin coats...much like you would do with any paint application.

    Did the same thing with the baskets. It dried clear, and glossy. Didn't have any problem with it for the 2-3 years I used it.

    Walt
     
  4. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

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    My first extractor was a galvanized unti that I coated with camcote. It is great stuff.
    And I think I was able to sell the unit for a nice price since it was already coated. So you can also look at it as an investment on your equipment.
     
  5. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    I tried to find camcote in canada, and after numerous phone calls and a couple of hours on line, I gave up. u used Kelnk's swiss formula tub enamel instead. It may or may not be food safe, but contrary to other posts, epoxies are generally non toxic when cured. many people make epoxy fish tanks and fish are extremely sensitive to toxins.
     
  6. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

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    I think Sherwin Williams has some two part epoxy paint suitable for waterproofing potable water tanks. I think in their industrial line so not available in small amounts. Remember all the hue and cry a few years ago about the bisphenol acetate of whatever in baby bottles sports drinks and canning can liner material. If you look at the data sheet for some epoxies it is one of the main ingredients. Crazy8days was not out to lunch on that. Personally I have had such a whack of chemical exposure that I am either immune or one sip away from achieving critical dose. You cant worry about every one of lifes little dangers without going crazy but when someone tells you not to sleep on train tracks, pay attention.
     
  7. Marbees

    Marbees Member

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    I ordered mine from brushy mountain, didn't have time to use it yet, maybe this winter:roll:
     
  8. jim314

    jim314 New Member

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    I have a quart on order from them too. I'm going to paint it on when the temps are still high to help the curing.
     
  9. Adam Foster Collins

    Adam Foster Collins New Member

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    I used klenks as well. It's used for sinks and tubs. I also powder-coated the reel, and made new parts out of that plastic material used to make industrial cutting boards. The interior of my extractor is pure white.

    When I did my extractor, I began by completely disassembling the extractor. Then I cleaned all the parts with tsp, scoured the drum with steel wool and tsp. Dried it thoroughly, and coated the drum with several coats of epoxy coating in a small room with the temperature raised to optimum. ( wore a respirator always while painting, and kept the room ventilated away from living areas) I kept it there for days while recoating. I think I was finished painting in a few days, and I kept it at an elevated temperature for several more.

    I refinished all the moving parts, and greased with food-safe lubricant. I replaced any fasteners in the reel with stainless steel.

    Then I kept the whole, refinished unit in a warm, dry environment for a year. Turned a 4 frame reversible extractor into one that will hold 28 mediums radially. The old Jones reversible extractors had a really big drum diameter to accommodate the flipping of the frame cages.

    Looks like it'll be two years of curing before I use it, as I have been making bees this year, not honey.

    I found it a very difficult area to get clear and conclusive information on. Bottom line is that to be "food safe", it has to be edible. Not much truly qualifies. But many epoxy-based coatings create a good, non-toxic surface if applied and cured properly. Also, I would not store honey in that tank, but run it right out into other containers. Honey is acidic. It eats the zinc in a galvanized drum.

    Adam
     
  10. Marbees

    Marbees Member

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    It's enamel, kitchen sinks, pots and pans used to be finished that way, stainless steel pots were a very rare thing, when I was a kid.
    OK that enamel was baked, so enduring high temperatures wasn't a problem, however honey extractor is not exposed to high temperatures. Clean with dish-soap and water after use, and it will last a lifetime. :thumbsup: Use non abrasive sponge!

     
  11. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Adam, post a couple of those pictures. :wink: Excellent job! :thumbsup:
     
  12. Adam Foster Collins

    Adam Foster Collins New Member

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    Perry,
    I post pictures so rarely, that I forget how to do it, and forget the password to where I hosted the pictures. You're welcome to post them if you like. I think I sent all of the ones I have to you.

    Adam