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I don't know about northern winters, but I know if we get hard freezes, small colonies can't stay warm. By the same token, too large a colony better have good ventilation and plenty of stores.
Cold doesn't kill by itself, humidity or drafts and hunger, they kill. Bees use more food in a mild winter, because they are flying, than if they are in cluster.

now to your question, I'm thinking double it. I use a single deep and a single medium going into winter, that deep is bees and some honey, the medium is all honey, but we have mild winters and they eat more. Try for local or northern advice on this one, Your hive should NOT be 5 deeps tall. Could you get another queen? if you could and you have that much brood, it's only August 9th.
 

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Appropriate colony size varies according to bee species (?) My Beeweaver bees reduce down to a pretty small cluster and grow up fast in the spring. One of my survivor hives has a huge winter population with good appetites, and a taste for robbing, I'm thinking they might be Italian. BeeWeaver queens are a genetically manipulated queen, controlled breeding environment I think. Beeweaver bees would not survive up north. There was a person on this site who lived in Minnesota I think and she kept Russians I think. You might search her posts - it is Riverbee. She is no longer active on this site
 
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