Can you thicken your honey?

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Kevin, Oct 12, 2013.

  1. Kevin

    Kevin New Member

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    Is it possible to thicken my honey?
    Also I tried making some creamed honey from from my crystalized honey but it went all runny in my bottom blender, couldnt go slow.... any advice would be great :)
     
  2. Ray

    Ray Member

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    How large an amount?
    Honey will absorb moisture from the air. How humid is it there?
    Heat is the traditional means of driving off excess water, but too much will spoil the honey.
    A freezer will remove moisture also.
    Feed it back to the bees, the're good at getting rid of excess moisture. :)
    ​Good Luck!
     

  3. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    The best way I've heard of is drying honey while it's still in the supers. This is done by stacking supers in a way that lets a fan circulate air through the combs. A de-humidifier in the room further speeds the prosess. The same can be done extracted honey, but since the surface area exposed to the air is quite small, it takes a long time. Some local producers here add dried powdered fruit to the honey to produce flavored honeys. The dried fruit powder absorbs some moisture from the honey.
     
  4. Kevin

    Kevin New Member

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    Thanks guys. Ive been beekeeping for 2 years now and it seems each time I take out honey its not nearly as thick as that available in the shops (from other areas). Im thinking it may be due to the high about of misty days we have here, nearly every day its misty in the morning, proper thick mist. But Im still hoping there may be a way to get it thicker. The fans and supers sounds like an idea.....
    ​Kevin
     
  5. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    Are you extracting capped super frames ? If the bees cap the honey, they will view it as ripe and suitable for long term storage (if needed).

    Some strains of bees are slow to cap honey. With uncapped honey you can do the "shake test". You hold a frame with uncapped honey horizontally above the opened hive and give a quick downward shake. If you get drops of honey thrown out onto the top bars then it is not ripe and not suitable for extracting. I am unsure if this test applies in a hot climate. :?:
     
  6. Kevin

    Kevin New Member

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    Yes capped supers. I prefer thicker honey though this is why Im asking :)
     
  7. Zulu

    Zulu Member

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    Kevin you are dry enough in the Namib to be able to make a plan, max air exposure , so large flat container and keep out any insects, don't leave it out when the fog rolls in
     
  8. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    Honeys of the same moisture content will have different thicknesses or viscosity pollen and other foreign particles make a big difference I wouldn't worrk about it to much
     
  9. lazy shooter

    lazy shooter New Member

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    photo.jpg Add masa to it. Masa thickens every thing. :)
     
  10. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    You may wish to make some thicker honey just for family consumption.

    You could find that your local public wants "local natural honey". A bit of sales talk can lead to a regular customer for your special flavour un-treated honey. I can sell more liquid honey than I produce so why should I go to the extra work to make creamed honey ?
     
  11. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I am guessing you live in a fairly hot location?

    Like several of the above post suggest either dry air pumped thru the supers prior to extraction or ac before or after extraction will accomplish you primary objective here. I have had folks suggest that my own honey appeared thin when I was selling it on a paved parking lot in July when the temperature was 90 plus and I simply tell them to come back in December and then perhaps the thickness of the honey will then suit them.

    are you attempting to make creamed honey without using any kind of refrigeration?
     
  12. DLMKA

    DLMKA New Member

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    I extracted 120 lbs recently that looked runny coming from the extractor and in bottles looked really thin. Had a friend check with their refractometer and it came back at 18.1%. Higher than I would like but within the limits for Grade A honey. It's just the nectar source that made less viscous honey.