Candle making?

Discussion in 'Products of the Hive' started by brooksbeefarm, Nov 3, 2012.

  1. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

    Messages:
    5,829
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I would really like to learn how to make nice hand-dipped candles. There is a knack to it that I have not figured out yet.
     
  2. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

    Messages:
    2,060
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    I have frames made using 2" X 1/8" aluminum flat stock drilled a hole in each end for 3/8 ready rod, nut on each side on the bottom bar, only one nut under the bar on top. I have a small hole drilled in the edge of the botom bar to tie the wick to start and filed nicks in the edge of the top and bottom bar every 2" to keep the wick straight and from slipping along the bar. Tie the wick in the first hole and bring the wick up over the top bar and down to the bottom bar across from where you started then across and down to the next notch in the bar, Keep warping the wick around the bar till you come to the end and have 12 vertical strings and tie the end at the small hole on the other end and side of the bottom bar. dip the first time to about 13 1/2" to coat wick and then pip to 12 3/4" and dip a little deeper each time, when the candle gets to with in 1/8" of the disired size cut the candles off at the bottom and do the last 2 or 3 dips ti finish the bottoms and the desired thickness. I do a double dip, I dip the candle pet the wax solidify and dip again after the drips stop i place it aside and dip the next bar in the same fashion and continue till all 5 frames are dipped and the start back at the first one again. with using 5 bars the timing between dips is long enough for the wax to cool but sill be warm so the next layer of wax melts into the previouse layer so you don't get air pockets.
     

  3. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm Active Member

    Messages:
    3,281
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Sorry AP, do you have any pictures, i don't have a clue of what i just read.:???: ??? Jack
     
  4. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

    Messages:
    2,060
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    No, but I'll take some.
     
  5. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

    Messages:
    5,829
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hey, hey, the tea lites I ordered just arrived! :thumbsup:
    Enough to make 500 of 'em and I have just enough wax left (I hope). :???:
    Nope, just did the calculations and I don't have near enough wax. :sad:
    Oh well, I can crank out maybe 125 or so.

    Tea Lites 001.jpg
     
  6. Papakeith

    Papakeith New Member

    Messages:
    509
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    anyone using plastic split molds?
    I just picked up one from my aunt.
    It snaps together.
    I didn't figure I needed instructions. Get the wick in there, snap it together and pour.

    WRONG! :doh: :)

    Thankfully I laid down plastic under my work area.

    So, how do you go about sealing this type of mold so the liquid wax doesn't just pour out?
     
  7. Walt B

    Walt B Active Member

    Messages:
    1,146
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Keith, Don't know anything about molds, but your post leaves some wonderful and funny visions to the imagination. :lol: :thumbsup:Thanks,

    Walt
     
  8. Papakeith

    Papakeith New Member

    Messages:
    509
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    It was a moment, that's for sure. :D

    I'm hoping that I didn't have the wax too hot and damage the mold. The more I look at it the more it looks like that may be exactly what I may have done. The mold no longer seems to snap together as it did.

    I'll clean it up the rest of the way and see where I'm at at that point
     
  9. Papakeith

    Papakeith New Member

    Messages:
    509
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Here's what I've learned. Hotter isn't necessarily better. I never even thought I could have it too hot . I could and I think I did.
    I cleaned the mold and then used a series of magnets to hold the halves tight together. I then lowered the temp of the wax to just about 150. Just so that a skin was forming around the outer edges of the pot. I poured a bit in and swirled it around the seam. No leaking. A bit more. swirl. still no leaks. Go for broke. I filled the mold. No leaks!. Looks like I may have a candle once it cools down

    first candle.jpg
     
  10. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm Active Member

    Messages:
    3,281
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Let us know how it turns out,i think someone posted that once you start pouring, don't stop until the mold is full.?? Jack
     
  11. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

    Messages:
    5,829
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    First time I've laid eyes on a mold like that. It will be interesting to see how it turns out. :thumbsup:
     
  12. Papakeith

    Papakeith New Member

    Messages:
    509
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Yep:???: the candle came out all flaky on the outside. Back into the melting pot.

    Pour number 3.
    A bit warmer wax at 160ish.
    magnets in place
    1 single pour until the mold was full
    and.. . .:beg:

    No leaks!:Dancing:

    Now the hard part, waiting until it cools.

    Are you supposed to top off the mold as it cools and shrinks? or just let it be whatever it ends up being?

    can I hasten the cool down by placing it in the fridge or freezer? Patience isn't a strong suit :)
     
  13. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

    Messages:
    5,829
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I wouldn't put it in the freezer, let it cool slowly. I usually "top off" the candles as they start to harden. The taller ones tend to form a hole or well around the wick. Even if it does and it is hard, once you have the candle out you can open up the hole a bit and top off with a bit of wax.
     
  14. Papakeith

    Papakeith New Member

    Messages:
    509
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    cool.

    BTW when I was out buying a spool of wick yesterday. I was shocked what they were asking for a pound of bees wax. 18.00$
     
  15. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

    Messages:
    5,829
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    And then you wonder why folks are trying to find beekeepers to buy their wax from. Most retail wax is a fortune.

    Up here most wax from keeps can be had for around $7.50 a pound, if they're selling.
     
  16. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm Active Member

    Messages:
    3,281
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    The reason it's cheaper in perry's country, it takes 6 mounths to thaw it out. :lol: Jack
     
  17. Papakeith

    Papakeith New Member

    Messages:
    509
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I guess that the third pour is the charm. It came out perfect.
    :)

    uploadfromtaptalk1355675986816.jpg

    Sent from my DROID BIONIC using Tapatalk 2
     
  18. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

    Messages:
    5,829
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Looks good buddy! :thumbsup: No quit in you! :mrgreen:
     
  19. Walt B

    Walt B Active Member

    Messages:
    1,146
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Glad you had success. That looks GREAT! :thumbsup:

    Walt
     
  20. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

    Messages:
    5,829
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Alright, I gave it a shot.
    First half dozen I did by pouring wax first and then putting in the wicks. (I found it a pain, couldn't tell when the tab was centered).
    Next batch I put the wicked tabs in first and then poured and it seemed easier.

    Tea lites and cake 011.jpg Tea lites and cake 012.jpg Tea lites and cake 015.jpg Tea lites and cake 017.jpg Tea lites and cake 018.jpg Tea lites and cake 019.jpg