candy board frames

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by reidi_tim, Nov 5, 2012.

  1. reidi_tim

    reidi_tim New Member

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    One of my hives is noticeable lighter then the rest. I have put candy boards on top of all my hives with a center filling of protein patties and still feeding 2:1 but that is going to stop when the temp drops off a bit more. I was thinking of making candy boards out of a few empty frames and put them on the outside of the frames that still have honey and pollen. Or any thoughts on the a good way to put some insurance for over wintering
     
  2. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    You don't want to break the cluster in any way trying to arrange frames to put them in. Place them on top and have extras made up and when ever you have a warm day thru the winter check the candy board and if it has a bit gone replace it with a new one you can add more candy to the one you took of and place it back on at a later date. It is important to have stores above the cluster cause if the bees get to one side of the super and the frames on that side become empty, with out stores above for feed so the cluster can migrate back to the other side they can starve with lots of honey still in the hive.
    Once spring comes and the weather warms up you can put partial candy boards back on for the bees to clean of.
    Just My thoughts on the subject.
     

  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    it sounds to me like empty frames as candy boards is a lot of effort for an end product that is inherently inferior in several ways. more mess, less end product, not always available when NEEDED. without a doubt I am almost by definition a slave to simplicity.
     
  4. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    What Apis said, on top is always better than the sides for just the reason he mentions.
     
  5. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    "What Apis said, on top is always better than the sides for just the reason he mentions."

    ditto tim......
     
  6. reidi_tim

    reidi_tim New Member

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    Ok, maybe I did not ask what I was wanting to. The hive at best has four frames between the two deeps that have anything in them. The other 16 are just drawn comb. Time is getting short before the weather drops below 60 ish. What are the options??
     
  7. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I'm making paper plate fondant boards with pollen substitute mixed in. Set candy on top of frames, put inner cover over top (screening center hole to keep bees from eating the insulation board on top of it.)

    I would reduce real estate if it was my hive. Get them down into one box on a warm day if you still have those, get a double screen on top of a strong hive, and put this single box on top of it, then candy on top of those center 4 frames, inner cover (screen opening) insulation board and telescoping cover.

    But I can still open my hives, don't know if you can.
     
  8. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Solid advice from Gypsi (weather permitting). Fondant is the way to go at this point.
     
  9. reidi_tim

    reidi_tim New Member

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    That sounds like a plan Sunday its going to be dry and close to 70 ( been wet and 50 ish the last couple of weeks) so weathering allowing I will try to do this .
     
  10. Tyro

    Tyro Member

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    I tried that very strategy for two winters. It didn't work well for me. The bees didn't seem to 'get on' the frames like they needed to. In the end, I would have a bunch of sugar candy frames that I could try to store over the summer (not fun), pitch or try to reboil (generally, the sugar burned).

    I switched to sugar bricks (search term 'sugar bricks' here on the forum) and they worked MUCH better for me.

    Mike
     
  11. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Mike,

    The difference between your sugar brick recipe and my paper plate fondant recipe (which I'm actually going to pour on cookie sheets with foil on them, is not very much. But I am adding pollen substitute to mine, save me changing feed in the spring. I am not pouring in a frame, just setting on top of frames under inner cover.
     
  12. Tyro

    Tyro Member

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    I am actually going to try to make mine with pollen sub this year as well. I used to pour them into frames.


    I give myself an 'A' for determination and effort with respect to the sugar frames, but a 'D' for overall effectiveness and success!

    I put the bricks on top now too - the bees seem to access the feed much better that way.
     

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  13. reidi_tim

    reidi_tim New Member

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    I made the candy boards- fondant with 1/2 lb of pollen patties in each one, did them in two steps layer of candy in two boards added the pollen patties and then put a second layer of candy to seal the pollen patties. I did the same thing with the frames for just in case , the last time the weather was good enough to go all the way threw the hives was 2 + weeks ago. Saturday it was around 65 but a pretty strong wind so I tried to do a quick check and push the bees in a single deep, to my amazement they had put stores into the top deep and all the hives had a lot of bees, more then when I did my last inspection. I removed the first frame from the center that was empty and replaced it with a candy frame and left them in a double deep. After the fact I drilled a hole in the center of the candy boards for ventilation. Put the entrance reducer in place with wire mesh for a mouse guard. Read the bees a bed time story :grin: and whished them all a good night. Neighbor came over Sunday and got the the holes drilled for the post to mount a 30 x 144 skid on to get the hives up a little higher to make it easier for me to do inspections, and have a place other then the ground to set the boxes on. Lastly I have the shb traps that the fat bee guy talked about do I leave them in over winter or take them out?:???:
     

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  14. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a tyro snip..
    I give myself an 'A' for determination and effort with respect to the sugar frames, but a 'D' for overall effectiveness and success!

    tecumseh...
    although having the feed in the frame vs over the top of the cluster may seem to small a detail to consider important this suggest to me the three most important points here are location, location, location.
     
  15. Tyro

    Tyro Member

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    Based on my experience - I would agree!
     
  16. reidi_tim

    reidi_tim New Member

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    Ok I guess I'm really confused now:dontknow::???: they have a 17 lb candy board on the top of the cluster and a 4 lb frame next to their last frame of stores, what am I missing on location? It is possible but not very probable that I will be able to get to open the hives up before spring.:frustrated:
     
  17. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    set directly above the cluster the workers will be in contact with this block of sugar almost constantly. set into frames depending on where the center of the cluster is positioned the workers may or may not be in contact with what appears to be exactly the same block of sugar.... as the cluster moves, in an horizontally fashion, sometimes it would be in full contact with the block of sugar and sometime not. and of course there is no rule saying you could not do both. if you did have to chose, one or the other, to my way of thinking overhead is the better choice.