capped brood found in honey super above queen excluder!

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by adamant, May 26, 2012.

  1. adamant

    adamant Member

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    Found capped brood above queen excluder in honey super! Is that a problem? I have a pic but can't fiquire out how to post it with my blackberry from the field!
     
  2. dr.buzz

    dr.buzz New Member

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    Does your hive have an upper entrance? If not, drones might be trapped in there with no way out. Either you have put the queen excluder in and accidentally left the queen above it, or the queen got through the excluder because she is small or the excluder has a bent wire or something.....OR you had larvae/eggs already in the super and when you put the excluder in, the bees above the excluder raised a new queen from it. Or you already had a two queen colony before you put the excluder in.

    I guess I'd be curious if there were also eggs/larvae/capped brood below the excluder as well.

    As far as being a problem....you might want to figure out how it happened and how many queens you have, but otherwise, when the brood emerges those cells will most likely just get filled with honey and you can extract it as normal.
     

  3. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Like already mentioned, you should try and figure out how she got up there, but it certainly isn't a major problem or anything. If there is only one queen, make sure she ends up below it.
     
  4. adamant

    adamant Member

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    THANK YOU BOTH.. I WILL CHECK THE ABOVE remarks


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  5. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    If you have 2 laying queens, and can manage to avoid having the ladies meet, you can build a super powerful two queen colony, while I have seen it done on one or two occasions, requires alot of patience and making sure whats going where but 4 brood chambers, for 2 queens separating the queens by the excluder. It has been said the queens would fight through the excluder, but should you find the upper queen, and add brood chambers accordingly again absolutely ensuring the two queens are always separated by the excluder. result will be a super powerful colony, am thinking that this probably if you do it, in the future, should be done about a month earlier. but the nectar flow up north stays fairly Strong through out the summer with few prolonged breaks, should you do this you will have to be ready to super up to give them space to store the nectar----alot of space like double the numbers of supers.
    Barry
     
  6. adamant

    adamant Member

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    i broke it all down and could not find the queen in the top boxes above the queen excluder. but i did find the queen in the brood box. some cells above the queen excluder had two larvae in the cells some has single. is that telling me that its a drone layer?
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  7. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    First off, that second picture of the shiny wet larvae is FANTASTIC! :shock: :thumbsup: :clapping:

    Second, if you have a queen below the excluder and yet you appear to have eggs above, some with more than one egg, it hints to you maybe having a young queen up above. Young queens when they first start laying often lay more than one egg per cell for a few days until they get themselves sorted out.
     
  8. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    add to what Perry said, make absolutely sure you don't inadvertently allow the 2 queens to meet, or one or both will die in the fight that follows Usually if mother and daughter queens are laying in same colony--eventually the older queen one day disappears. but as stated previously if your very careful you can manage a 2 queen colony but is labor intensive and have to know where each queen is to avoid the accidental meeting. BTW excellent pics
    Barry
     
  9. adamant

    adamant Member

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    this is what i did. i shook all the bees from above the honey excluder to the ground in front of the entrance and put everything back together. i need to make honey! so what do i do? let the larvae take its course and after the hatch they will clean out the cells and fill them with honey?
     
  10. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Yes, any larvae above the excluder will hatch out and be backfilled with honey.
     
  11. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    well apparently you did'nt read what I posted about what honey you could expect from running a 2 queen colony, too late for that assuming that infact there were 2 laying queens. As Perry stated the brood above the excluder will hatch out within a couple of weeks, and the combs would be back filled.
    Barry
     
  12. dr.buzz

    dr.buzz New Member

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    Maybe I'm retarded and can't read right, but did I gather correctly that you are leaving eggs and young larvae above a QE without a queen?
    If so, they will probably raise a new queen and you will be in the same position you were in when you made your original post. If no queen is leaving footprint pheromones above the QE because you shook her out, but there are eggs/larvae above the QE, they will raise a new queen. It's called the Harden Method and it's how you would rear queens in a queenright colony by raising eggs/larvae above a QE and leaving the Q down below it.
     
  13. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Many times i have found drone brood above the queen excluder, (in fact just yesterday:roll:) usually on the bottom of a honey frame. My 87 yr. old beekeeper buddy says a strong hive with several supers will allow or tolerate some laying worker activity?? The picture shown above is the work of a queen,could of been a new queen that layed above the EQ and made it through the excluder before her abdomen fully developed. Jack
     
  14. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Now that is very interesting, I had not heard of this before. :dontknow: