capping honey

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by rast, Apr 24, 2010.

  1. rast

    rast New Member

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    My bees are in no hurry at all to cap the supers so far this year. Time to get the orange honey off and move on. I wanted to take them south to palmetto, but that may not happen. Must be because of the rain. I won't sell watered down honey.
     
  2. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    The honey may be cured but simply not capped. If you have a refractometer why not pull just a little, do an extraction and see what the refractometer tells you.

    Most time here once the season has turned off a bit dryer, whatever honey is in the comb is pretty much cured.
     

  3. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper New Member

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    Just use a eye droper to suck some honey from the cells to place on the refractor.
    the shake test is pretty close also. If it shakes out leave it, if not it is good to exrtact.

    :mrgreen: Al
     
  4. rast

    rast New Member

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    Thanks, I'll try the shake test, never bought a refractor.
     
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    whether splash/no splash might tell you if the honey is cured is likely highly related to general atmospheric moisture.

    for example just a bit west of here where the air is very dry, non splash should indicate honey in the comb is cured. yet if I go a bit south of here, where the air is always 80 to 90 percent, non splash likely tells you little.

    If I had any $ value of orange blossom honey I think I would invest in an eyedropper (most excellent suggestion Al) and a refractometer.
     
  6. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper New Member

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    To buy a refractor do a goggle search. I bought mine from a company ad on line and was less than $100.00 for the same one in Dadants catalog for $300.00. I bought it several years ago so I can only think I remember the company started with the name National ----------.

    It came with the little eye droper too.

    :mrgreen: Al
     
  7. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper New Member

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  8. rast

    rast New Member

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    3-4 in. of rain last night but didn't feel real humid today. Didn't ever sweat in a long sleeve shirt and jeans this evening.
    I could not shake or tap (on the hive body) the honey out of the uncapped part of the combs, another beek down here told me he just put's the supers in a room with a dehumidifier for a couple of days.
     
  9. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    Tallow honey along the Louisiana and Texas Gulf coast has a long and known history for being 'wet'. They have gizmos for drying the honey. but some folks just set boxes of honey in room with ac units which pulls water from the air. I would think a variation on a heating room where you had some kind of air circulation up thru the stack of boxes would make the task go quicker.

    good luck with taking off the 'good stuff' rast.....