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On Sunday, I captured a swarm that had come from one of my hives earlier in the week. I now am faced with a new colony that just came into existence right at the end of a nectar flow.

I am already using a hive-top feeder and have provided pollen patties so they can begin to put stores in.

My fear is that I am not going to be able to get them ready in time for the winter. What else should I be doing for them at the current state of the hive? Also, I have yet to treat for varroa but I am reluctant to do so as I do not want to stress the hive. How long should I wait to treat?
 

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You can't do much more than that, unless you have some frames of honey to give them. Feed them steadily with sugar and pollen sub, then late fall, if you don't think they are ready, add a large block of fondant or combine them with another hive.

A swarm has been through a broodless span, so shouldn't need treating the first season. Check them next year and treat if needed.
 

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Sorry to disagree with Iddee. :oops:
While broodless, anti varroa treatment is easiest and most effective, if there is no brood on which the mites can lay eggs and there are no closed cells in which they are hidden and can evade treatment.
Only adult bees, possibly with varroa hanging on are available. If you get them all clean, your hive will be clean for a longer time once they start raising brood. In addition, if you use any strong chemicals for the treatment, the less built comb you have inside means less of a chance there is for residues that might remain in the wax and later effect the queen's laying abilities. :D
 

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a snip..
How long should I wait to treat?

tecumseh:
there are a variety of choices. I myself am in the treatmentless camp so never would be one option. I will say that I do understand the logic of efmesch post in regards to treating early and prior to the rearing of brood. I would think that with limited number of brood and comb even the more organic remedies might be easier to accomplish.
 

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It's a trade off, in my opinion. The few mites that travel with a swarm, versus the damage to the bees done by the treatment.

As for reinfesting, the mites will be back as soon as the swarm starts accepting the neighborhood drones and feeding them as they pass through.

Since the swarm has limited numbers, and will have no new workers for a minimum 3 weeks, no stores, and haven't learned the area, I want to keep the disturbance to a minimum.
 
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