Capturing bees for new hive

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by dejswa, Aug 16, 2010.

  1. dejswa

    dejswa New Member

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    I'm new to beekeeping so I don't know if this makes any sense at all but here is my question.

    I have a new hive in Dallas and have been using an external feeder since we have had many days above 100 degrees and a draught as well. I started off with a quart or so of sugar water and was refilling several times per day. I eventually went to a chicken water dispenser (2.5 gal) with a towel in the trough and they even managed to empty that twice in one day. (That is 17 # of sugar!) So now I take a closer look at my hive and figure that I must be feeding every bee within a few square miles as well as my hive since after almost 100# of sugar, the hive does not weigh much more than it did a few weeks ago and comb / brood production is not up by much.

    During the day on the towel on the feeder, it is thick with bees (like maybe 10,000) or at least as many as you get when you order a few # of bees in the mail.

    So my thought is whether or not one might capture these bees, order a new queen and start a new hive an how to do it.

    Is this something that is feasable? Could it bee done with a bee vac and then just hive them with a new queen?

    I'll post some photos soon re the feeder and the swarms of bees.
     
  2. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    You wont have much luck doing this. It would be a lot easier to put a top feeder on the hive and quite feeding the neighborhood dinner. If you want additional hives do a split or buy a nuc it would be much easier. Remember the bees you are capturing are older bees out foraging the young nurse bees are back at the hive. Most your bees you capture would die off before the first round of brood hatches
     

  3. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    The rat gave you some good info there. I would quit feeding for three or four days so the bees from other hives will stop coming around. Then start feeding with a top feeder of some sort. If you have an inner cover with a hole in it just use the boardman type feeder on top of it with a deep or a couple of shallow boxes on top then your outer cover.

    I took some 1/2" plywood the same size as the inner cover and cut a 2 3/4" hole in it (wallow out the hole just a little) and a quart jar will fit nicely. Replaced the inner cover with the plywood, add a deep box and the outer cover. You could even drill several holes for multiple feeder jars.

    Might need to watch out for robbing since you were feeding all of the neighbors bees. Reduce the entrance down a bit so your hive can defend the opening.
     
  4. dejswa

    dejswa New Member

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    Good point about the older bees being the ones I would be capturing.

    And yes, I have ordered a top feeder that should be here in a few days.

    Thanks for the info!
     
  5. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    Please excuse me I forgot to introduce myself Im da rat and I say welcome to the forum hope to see you around the forum frequently :wave:
     
  6. dejswa

    dejswa New Member

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    Thanks, I'll have a few more questions, no doubt.
     
  7. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    you have discovered the real limitation of pot feeding (feeding bees in some sort or pot).