CATCH THE BUZZ By Kim Flottum

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Iddee, Apr 21, 2009.

  1. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    CATCH THE BUZZ

    Minneapolis Wants Honey Bees!

    By Alan Harman

    Minneapolis takes a step towards ending a 34-year ban and allowing beekeeping within city limits.

    The council's Public Safety and Regulatory Services Committee voted unanimously for a city ordinance allowing anyone living on 1/2 acre or less to have up to two bee colonies.

    A lot larger than 1/2 acre but smaller than 3/4 acre can have four colonies; larger than 3/4 acre lot but smaller than one acre six colonies; one acre but smaller than five acres eight colonies;

    For lots larger than five acres the number will be decided by the MACC manager.

    Consent from all abutting property owners would be required, plus 80% of owners within 100 feet of the keeper's lot. The bee area would have to be fenced, with flyways devised with barriers of at least six feet to get bees to altitude quickly when the hive is less than 25 feet from a property line.

    The ordinance requires would-be beekeepers to pay $100 for a permit and then $50 a year for a licence. Applicants would have to meet an educational requirement before getting the permit. Minneapolis Animal Care and Control (MACC) will inspect the premises at least annually.

    The committee vote came after MACC spent eight months researching the topic and spoke with a number of individuals. In particular, University of Minnesota Prof. Marla Spivak provided significant information and feedback on the proposed ordinance. Spivak is nationally recognized for her work with honeybees.

    MACC also spoke to Bill Stephenson from St. Paul Animal Control. Beekeeping is permitted in St. Paul and Stephenson says the greatest investment of time is the initial permit, but after that they have seen few issues.

    Beekeepers serving the community by removing a swarm or swarms of honeybees from locations where they are not desired will not be considered in violation of the law limiting the number of colonies while housing the swarm on the apiary lot for no more than 30 days.

    The full council will vote on the proposal April 25.

    This message brought to you by Bee Culture, The Magazine Of American Beekeeping

    www.BeeCulture.com

    Supporting EAS 2009 www.easternapiculture.org
     
  2. indypartridge

    indypartridge New Member

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    Well, I suppose it's a good thing overall, but a $100 permit plus $50 a year is pricey. I wonder what a dog license costs there? I bet if they keep statistics over the next few years, they'll have more "dog problems" than "bee problems".
     

  3. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    After 34 years of being banned, let's hope it is just a politician's way of stepping. First a foot in the door, then keep adding on. Maybe next year the fee will be halved, ETC. ETC., like they do taxes. All taxes are only installed temporarily, then made permanent later. Let's hope that's their goal with this.
     
  4. PCM_old

    PCM_old New Member

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    Looks like the politicans found another source for raising money !

    With the down turn in sales tax revenue, and less Federal money cities & counties are finding many ways to obtain, " Use Tax "

    There was a article about this type of " tax " in our local paper awhile back.

    Example;
    1-Cities that own or distribute, water, electric, gas, garbage,etc.
    are raising the rates quite a bit to pay for street repairs, etc.
    Oh, and don't forget the local graft !
    2-Look for Fees to be increased, or new fees added to things which are normaly free.

    PCM