catching swarms

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by 2kooldad, Jun 25, 2011.

  1. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    can you realy advertise yourself to come and get swarms...how do you do that...like craigs list type stuff only...or can you give the police station and fire department your number for use when they get calls...as im sure they do...what about pest controll guys ???
     
  2. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    You are hitting on all of the good places to place your name and number.

    Craigs list has gotten me several calls this year, I list in the farm and garden section, someone has been flagging all of the bee removal listings though.

    Pest control guys are good for several calls, get in good with them.

    Police dept, fire department, animal control, parks department, ag extension agent, etc.

    Local bee club has listings.

    Advertisement on bulletin boards at tractor supply, co-op, feed stores, etc.

    And of course you can add your name right here on the forum. Have had several calls that were too far away for me but managed to find someone that was willing to go and closer to boot.
     

  3. Bsweet

    Bsweet Member

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    I do all the above plus, Tree removal and landscapers, remodel contractors, Real Estate offices with property rental managment. Jim
     
  4. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    I forgot about the tree removal guys along with the power company and water/sewer department
     
  5. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    how many times do yall get calls....how much equipment should a person have on hand (empty hives an such) before he puts his name out for this....is there a ''season'' that yall get swamped with calls....what happends then...do you call other beeks for backup ???
     
  6. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    around here the last week of April, May and June are our best swarm months.
    Cut out calls are from March til frost, anytime the bees are flying and people notice them.
    Bee trees are year around, have had several lately with all of the storms.

    As far as gear is concerned, nice to have extra stuff on hand if you are going to advertise because they will always call when you are out of stuff. But even an old oil box will work to get a swarm back to the house.

    The calls vary from year to year for me. '09 was covered up, '10 nothing, '11 covered up, just never can tell. Biggest thing I am hearing from people who call me is nobody else was willing to come out, would not answer the phone, or did come out and did not want to tackle the situation.

    I have a list of names and numbers of some people who have contacted me and I will throw them some calls every now and then, or try others on the forums lists, or our local clubs list.

    I do charge for doing cut outs but some don't and can pass their names on for those who do not want to pay.
     
  7. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    i bet they do...but what do you do with all of them...i mean at some point dont ya have enuff...what then...do you re queen an then sell them as nucs...hmmmmm.

    I wont do it till ive got some equipment ready...i have to be carefull too cause the front line of the AHB war is where i live...just south of me is where they get reeeeeallly nasty...just had somebody get got last week 40 miles south of me in tarpon springs.

    Ima try the utility companys too...i find em in tv an tele boxs all the time...but i dont wana get ahead of the horse...i still gotta get some equipment n hives ready...do you use a bee vac ???
     
  8. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Yes, made two robo type vacs, one 10 frame and one 5 frame.

    Build you some of the plywood 5 frame nucs (plans per Drew Coates) they are handy as a pocket on a shirt.
     
  9. rast

    rast New Member

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    If you do get the cart ahead of the horse, I can loan you what you need including a bee vac.
     
  10. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    well ok...this was informative...i was figuring on a way to get more bees fast...but im not all that experianced yet...ive done one cut out...but it was in a old freezer box...not a tree or wall...i wouldnt know what to do with a bee vac...other than suck up bees from the entrance hole...what happens if they are in the wall to a persons house...i mean id have ta tear up the wall...do ya tell the people that what ever damage gets done to the structure is on them and try to be gental with things so as not to cost em to much...had a lady try to get me to come get bees out of her pine tree the other day...ida loved too but they were hived up and 25 ft in the air...told her id have to cut the tree down to get em out...then explained to her the benifit of bees and calmed her nerves about the bees becoming bloodthirsty killers and flying away with her dog or something...and Rast...that was in tarpon springs not far from the AHB incident they had down there last week...third colony ive found down there in the last 2 weeks...thanks for the offer to loan...ya never know whats comming with bees :)
     
  11. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    What to do with them when you have too many?
    Merge your swarms! By putting two or three swarms together you can quickly get one hive that is strong enough to produce a nice crop of honey early in the season. Select for the queen that you think is best (that is a science in itself) and eliminate the others. Follow the rules for combining the hives and you are in business. Besides, one big hive saves you from having to use many floors and tops--- so you have at least partially solved your problem of not enough equipment.
     
  12. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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  13. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    well....now i know ima need more tools...lol...how terrible for me...darn :|

    still though...i need more stuff now as it is...i need one more deep body to make all my hives but the nuc double deep...then i have to build more to keep as supers...we aint even talked about frames an i just ran out...lol...i love it...i had only intended to get one hive this year...bees colonys multiply like rabbits...i dont need food and water...just more wood.
     
  14. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Iddee: That is a mighty impressive collection of pictures!!! Makes me wish I had the presence of mind to take along my camera on some of my swarm collecting adventures. But I confess--nothing like what you have recorded. That bee tree is just amazing and the perfectly straight set of combs, built without any frames for guidance is a real impressive rarity.
    Here in Israel, since the invasion of the varroa mite (around 1982), wild hives have become a thing of the past. If a swarm sets up and doesn't get cared for by a beekeeper, it rarely lasts a year before the mites totally destroy them. A real shame.
     
  15. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    That's a surprise. We didn't get the mites until '87--'88. We had no feral bees during the '90s. About 2000, they begin a comeback. By '05 I was getting numerous calls. By '08, I was being told some had been there 3 or 4 years. They are building a natural resistance here.
     
  16. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    If I recall correctly, the varroa mite "transferred" from its natural host, an asiatic honeybee, to Apis mellifera as a result of a study that went afoul in Russia. The honeybees being used (for convenience sake) as an alternate host of the mite were released accidentally. From Russia they crossed Europe and reached the middle east in the early 1980's. It took them a few more years to cross the Atlantic (on imported bees?).
    Your comment about building a natural resistance is a very important one! In Israel we are at our wit's end because the "Check-mite" that has been our almost last resort for treatment seems to be losing its control capacity against varroa.
    ANY reliable information you can direct me to on this natural resistance development would be most valuable and appreciated here.
     
  17. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    I just remembered the name of the original varroa host--
    Apis cerana. This variety, a small bee, not very good at honey production, manages to live with the varroa mite because of its habit of frequently swarming. By leaving a hive with heavily infested brood, it sets up a new, clean home, and by going through a period without developing brood, the mite population dwindles for a while, only to catch up and force the family to swarm again.
     
  18. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Is it possible, "and legal", to ship queens from the USA to there?

    Otherwise, looking for feral colonies more than 2 years old is the best way I know to find resistance.

    Or just quit treating and keep buying bees until one survives. :eek:
     
  19. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Once, a long time ago, bees were regularly imported from the US to Israel. With the appearance of the varroa mite the gates were closed. To the best of my knowledge, no local beekeepers import any more on their own--it goes through our department of agriculture's bee department, if at all.

    As for looking for feral colonies---we're a very small country and the "density" of apiaries and the lack of isolated locations for feral colonies to develop is against us.

    I haven't bought a bee in years--mostly I build up my holdings (which in the past few years have been dwindling because of neglect due to family illness) by collecting swarms. Besides--they're more fun and challenging than buying (not to mention, they're cheaper=free). Maybe one of those swarms I get will be a blessing and show immunity.

    My request still stands--if you know of any articles or studies on the development of varroa resistance, please pass on the link.
     
  20. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Search....
    Dee Lusby

    Minnesota hygienic

    VSH

    I have never researched resistance studies, but have read a bit about them in passing. Those are 3 I remember recently.