Catching the queen!

Discussion in 'Swarms, Cut outs, and Trap outs' started by Dakine, May 24, 2012.

  1. Dakine

    Dakine New Member

    Messages:
    144
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    When I was doing bees about 25 years ago on another island I read somewhere on how to be sure you got the queen when you took the bees from a hollow tree. I think I read it in the "Hive and the Honeybee" as that's the only book I had. No longer have it tho.
    They stated that by drumming the tree all the bees would move up and out the top by slowly tapping the tree with a hammer.
    First you cut the tree from above the hive until you reached the top of the hive. Place a box with a hole in the bottom over the hole in the tree so the bees would go up into the box.
    Drum the tree and smoke the lower entrance hole until you have a LOT of bees in the box. Slide a queen extruder in between the tree and the box and wait for the bees to go back down. After a while check to see if the queen is trapped on the extruder.
    If so drum the tree moving as many bees as possible back into to box. Close hole and take the box of bees and the queen and put into a super with frames.
    I attempted to do this back then but didn't have much success. I have the same/similiar situation now with a coconut tree that has a upper and lower entrance. I can't cut the tree but I'd like to try getting the queen and bees.
    Maybe use a wire funnel on the top entrance and watch for the queen???

    Anyone done this or know anyone that has done so??
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    They also told me I could catch a bird by pouring salt on it's tail feathers. No one ever demonstrated it, tho.
     

  3. Dakine

    Dakine New Member

    Messages:
    144
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Isn't it true bees move up when you drum ??
     
  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Bees, maybe. Queen leaving brood, I doubt it.
     
  5. Dakine

    Dakine New Member

    Messages:
    144
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    DRUMMING
    Another method of transferring bees is by drumming them out
    of the old hive. To drum bees, remove the bottom of the old
    hive and turn it upside down. Place a new hive with drawn
    comb or foundation on top of the inverted box and close all
    openings. Drum vigorously with a rubber mallet, stick or
    hammer on the side of the
    old hive continuously for eight to ten
    minutes. This causes the bees and queen to move upward.
    Smoking the old colony before drumming is also helpful in
    starting the bees upward. When most of the bees have moved
    up into the new hive, a queen excluder is then placed between
    the new and old equipment and an upper entrance provided.
    After several days, the new hive should be checked for evidence
    of the queen. If the queen is not above, the queen
    excluder must be removed and the drumming process repeated.
    Three weeks later, after the queen has been confined above and
    all the brood has emerged below, the old hive may be removed
    and discarded.
    A variation of the above procedure would be to remove the
    combs from the old nest immediately after drumming the adult
    bees out and piecing the comb into empty frames for the new
    hive. This is accomplished by cutting large pieces of brood
    comb and then arranging them on a flat surface in empty
    frames. The pieces are held in place by wrapping string or
    stretching rubber bands around the frames. It is advisable to
    transfer only comb containing worker brood. Empty comb or
    comb with drone brood should be discarded. Comb with honey
    can be cut so the bees may rob it or pieced into frames as above
    for worker food.
    The advantage of drumming is that it is quick and requires little
    manipulation by the beekeeper. When brood comb is cut and
    placed into frames the colony will expand quickly in its new
    home and have a good chance of winter survival.

    http://agdev.anr.udel.edu/maarec/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/Removing_Bees.pdf


     
  6. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

    Messages:
    728
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    This is similar to 'driving' bees.

    Before the 20C and in some countries, bees were kept in straw skeps. One way to harvest the honey and wax from a full skep was to 'drive' the bees. The full hive was inverted and an empty hive placed on top. By rhythmically beating the full hive the bees would walk up into the empty hive. The comb from the bottom skep could then be harvested.

    A description of the technique, with picture and refinements, can be found in Gene Kritsky's book ' The Quest for the Perfect Hive ' p43.

    .:smile:
     
  7. jb63

    jb63 New Member

    Messages:
    588
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I read some where there is a beat of 110-120 beats per minute for drumming.The time can be found on a metronome.I could be wrong about the beats per minute ,so look it up.Good luck. http://youtu.be/_DuwXKsRdkE