CCD no big deal?

Discussion in 'Bee News' started by Ray, Sep 18, 2013.

  1. Ray

    Ray Member

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  2. Ray

    Ray Member

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    Snips, from Scientific America:

    Queens just don't seem as long-lived and fecund as they used to be, says David Tarpy, who researches beekeeping at the University of North Carolina.

    Tarpy found queen bees that spent their larval days in beeswax that was contaminated with a combination of two popular miticides, coumaphos and fluvalinate, had fewer live sperm.


    Reed Johnson, an entomologist at Ohio State University, found that exposure to a common combination of an insecticide, diflubenzuron, and a fungicide, propiconazole, increased the number of queens that die as larva in their little honeycomb cells.


    "I think we have known for a long time that miticides can adversely affect queens and kill drone sperm," says Dennis vanEngelsdorp, an entomologist at the University of Maryland who was one of the first to identify colony collapse disorder. "It's like chemotherapy. They know it's bad, but it's a lot better than the alternative."
     

  3. bamabww

    bamabww New Member

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  4. tmrschessie

    tmrschessie New Member

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    Again, chemicals misused may in fact be the problem. One of the reasons I went to only getting swarms. Then I did not take into account the foundation being contaminated that I buy....Live and learn.
     
  5. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    There is a a major difference between oil soluble and water soluble miticides. Coumaphos, which is oil soluble, penetrates the wax and stays there, leaving a probable residual effect on brood raised in the combs. On the other hand, Amitraz, as a water soluble chemical, doesn't become absorbed in the wax and after the treatment ends, the wax in principal, is not dangerous for the future rearing of bees or queens.
     
  6. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    It appears Efmesch is on to something. Fluvalinate and coumaphos are the two baddies it appears. Apivar (active ingredient Amitraz) is mentioned by Randy Oliver as leaving little if any residue behind.
     
  7. camero7

    camero7 Member

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    Apivar breaks down into a couple of metabolites but does not accumulate in wax AFAIK.

    [TABLE="width: 100%"]
    [TR]
    [TD="colspan: 2"]The French laboratory of ANSES in Sofia Antipolis, is the reference lab for the European Union for honey bee health. It has conducted a residue trial in 2007 whose results are consistent to previous ones:[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD]-
    [/TD]
    [TD]No residue of Amitraz was detected in honey after 10 weeks of treatment, regardless of the date of sampling. This is due to the instability of the active ingredient in an acid environment. Other studies have also proved that the amitraz is fully degraded after 10 days in honey.[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD]-
    [/TD]
    [TD]No residue of amitraz in wax after 24h after the removal of the strips.[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD="colspan: 2"]This publication also studied residues of coumaphos in honey and wax with less satisfactory results.

    Other studies concluded that quantities of residues of amitraz or its main metabolites in honey are always under the MRL.[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD="colspan: 2"]Ref: Martel A.C. et al, Acaricide residues in honey and wax after treatment of honey bee colonies with Apivar or Asuntol 50, Apidologie (2007), 38, 2002, 534-544
    Ref : R.M. Goodwin et al, Residues of amitraz in wax honey and propolis after using Apivar, 2002
    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [/TABLE]
     
  8. Ray

    Ray Member

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    R.E.D. FACTShttp://www.epa.gov/oppsrrd1/REDs/factsheets/0144fact.pdf

    Diflubenzuron
    Pesticide
    Reregistration
    All pesticides sold or distributed in the United States must be
    registered by EPA, based on scientific studies showing that they can be
    used without posing unreasonable risks to people or the environment.


    Ecological Effects
    Diflubenzuron is practically non-toxic to avian species, small
    mammals, freshwater fish and marine/estuarine fish on an acute oral dietary
    basis, while it is slightly toxic to avian species on a subacute dietary basis.

    Diflubenzuron is non-toxic to bees. The results indicate that diflubenzuron
    is very highly toxic to freshwater aquatic invertebrates, including
    marine/estuarine crustacea, while it is highly toxic to marine/estuarine
    mollusks. The results indicate that diflubenzuron affects reproduction,
    growth and survival in freshwater invertebrates as well as reproduction in
    marine/estuarine invertebrates.

    http://www.epa.gov/oppad001/reregistration/cca/propiconazole.htm

    Propiconazole has been approved by EPA for preserving wood used in millwork, shingles and shakes, siding, plywood, structural lumber and timbers and composites that are used in above ground applications only. Propiconazole is not for use on wood that will come in contact with food. Propiconazole 100SL is for industrial and commercial use only and for application by surface treatment (dip, brush, spray) or by pressure impregnation.
     
  9. tmrschessie

    tmrschessie New Member

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    My point being we don't know what is in the commercial wax we buy. It is most likely coming from many different sources. Tom
     
  10. camero7

    camero7 Member

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    then use plastic foundation or foundationless if you're concerned.