Chaulkbrood question

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by ibeelearning, May 20, 2012.

  1. ibeelearning

    ibeelearning Member

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    Backyard hobby beek; only harvest a few frames at a time; scrape, crush, and strain from plastic foundation.

    Last week, I was harvesting a frame and found a spot about the size of 2 quarters that seemed to be chaulkbrood. I just scraped it out with a spoon and threw it away. There was a little bit of discoloration left on the plastic as I leave a bit of foundation for the bees to rework. I returned the frames to the hive.

    This was a new hive started in dappled light in the wet spring last year before I recieved the Gospel of Iddee that the bees and my life would be more pleasant in full sun. I did not harvest from it last year, leaving it all for the bees to winter on. I am thinking that the fugus is from last year. It seemed like a small enough spot. The honey around it is great. The hive seems healthy and active. My default position is that the bees are a million years smarter than I am and can usually take care of themselves.

    When come the second thoughts...

    Q: Should I have thrown the frame away, or will the bees and heat be able to erradicate any remaining fugus? Should I go back in and replace that frame now? Or, am I just over-thinking this?
     
  2. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    your fine. All sounds good:thumbsup:
     

  3. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    It could well be that by moving the hives into a sunny area you did the best thing to evercome the chalkbrood. It tends to break out under conditions of excessive moisture, which is why it is usually only a periodic problem. Since you're asking about what has already been done, I would suggest, leave it, but keep your eyes open just in case.
     
  4. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a snip..
    the Gospel of Iddee

    tecumseh:
    funny in more ways than most folks can imagine. did you take the red or the blue pill?

    with persistent and constant cases of chalk changing out the queen is a good remedy to consider. less sever cases (and your's sounds to fall into this category) then modest changes in the environment typically remedies these without much human intervention.
     
  5. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    now that's funny tec, the red or the blue pill..:grin:
    the times i experienced chalkbrood is with nucs i purchased with older frames and/or in cold wet springs, and as tec said, environmental changes can remedy the chalkbrood, although not always. last year i had 2 nucs(i later hived) that couldn't shake the chalkbrood, so instead of ditching the queens i ditched the old frames with the chalkbrood that shouldn't have been 'recycled' to me anyway. those queens are still laying well. from your description i wouldn't trash the frame, the fungus as you said is probably from last year. sunlight, and ventilation helps. i would have done what you did with that small amount, scrape it and return it to the hive and see what happens, go from there. most times as tec said in less severe cases, should remedy itself.