Chaulkbrood? What to do?

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Barry Tolson, Jul 15, 2011.

  1. Barry Tolson

    Barry Tolson New Member

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    I have a colony that was going like gangbusters this spring. Now things have slowed some and there is still lots of capped brood, but I see larva being pulled from the cells and they end up on the floor looking like little dried up pellets. Chaulkbrood? If so...what to do? Thanks
     
  2. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    Make sure you have sufficient ventilation, I'm told. Shim the cover, remove any entrance reducers, add screen bottom board if possible. If it has been as wet there as it was here, there may be not much more you can do.
     

  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    sounds like chaulkbrood. if after doing what Hobie suggest above and if the chaulkbrood persist you might want to think of changing out the queen.
     
  4. Barry Tolson

    Barry Tolson New Member

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    Thanks for the feedback. I had thought about requeening, but question if it would be of any benefit as the current queen still seems to be very strong. Lots of laying, but the brood doesn't seem to be surviving. How might requeening help?
     
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    any number of diseases associated with honey bees have a significant genetic component. so the thinking would be you change the genetics and you alter a hive's ability to combat the disease. with little doubt (at least for me) you put a very young a vigorous queen in as a replacement in a troubled have and often this alone changes things dramatically.

    to my own way of thinking there can also be a significant geographic component to some diseases like chaulkbrood. for example Hobie has pointed out that atmospheric moisture is often time suspect number one and this factor alone may vary significantly even within a fairly small geographical area.
     
  6. Barry Tolson

    Barry Tolson New Member

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    Thanks Tecumseh...that makes sense.
    While we've had pretty dry weather the past few weeks, we "did" have a very wet spring...which I think was a factor. This colony was very full of bee's...and very full of open nectar...all while the weather was very wet. While things are quite a bit drier now,(both inside and outside the hive) I'm not seeing improvement here. Not getting any worse...but not thriving either.
    I'll be starting some new queens tomorrow anyway, so I think I "will" give re-queening a try.
     
  7. camero7

    camero7 Member

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    I peel a banana and put it on the top bars of the brood nest. Usually clears up chalk in about a week.
     
  8. Barry Tolson

    Barry Tolson New Member

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    Camero, What is the property of the banana that lends itself to helping chalk-brood? And..is it the banana or the peal that you place in the hive?