Checked hive with friend

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by crazy8days, Mar 14, 2012.

  1. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    Today went with a friend to check his two hives. This is his second year. Both have two deeps. Opened one and there were a lot of been in the inner cover. Hr pulled out the first frame and the top half was capped honey. Bottom and sides were still in nectar form. Pulled the next and there was a lot of pollen in the cells and the bottom had a queen cell with one inside. He didn't pull anymore frames but he wanted to peak at the lower deep. As we pried you could tell the top deep was very heavy. When we broke the seal and took a peak you could see what this newbie was queen cells between the bottom frame and the top frames of the bottom deep. We saw several drones going in and out of the opening. Wouldn't placing a empty framed deep in between these two help? Seems he is going to have a swarm on his hands soon.
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Placing an empty deep a hundred yards away might help. That hive is going to swarm, either artificial or natural. He needs to find the queen and remove her and about 5 frames of bees and brood. Move them a few feet away and let the original hive hatch a queen and go from there.
     

  3. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    He was talking about this weekend get a few nucs built and get them down the fence row up on trees.
     
  4. 2Tall

    2Tall New Member

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    The has been a very strange year so far,these things should not happen for at least 6 more weeks here in IN.
    I unwrapped some of my hives today and many are filling the empty parts of the candyboards with wax and drone comb .No option but to put boxes on and hope it doesn't get cold again.
     
  5. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Global Warming! :frustrated:
     
  6. indypartridge

    indypartridge New Member

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    Interesting. I'm well south of you and usually we're at least a week ahead of the northern Indiana bees as far as spring build-up, what's blooming, etc. I just did an in-depth inspection yesterday and had no sign of drones yet. Mine were building up nicely, but still far from being anywhere near swarm-mode. Hard to believe you're already seeing swarm cells.
     
  7. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a snip..
    pulled out the first frame and the top half was capped honey.

    tecumseh:
    a classical honey cap I suspect which has resulted in queen cells because the queen has no place to lay. done a bit ahead of time > reversing boxes and scratching one or two frames of the capped frames (the honey cap) and then placing an empty box on top would likely have eliminated this problem and possible gotten a new box of frames and foundation drawn.

    a proactive approach once you notice queen cells (often times a new bee keeper will confuse dry queen cell cups with queen cells themselves???) would be to remove the existing queen in some smaller box and then to use any existing queen cells in X number of nucs. I myself typically take the old queen some distance down the road and leave the queen cells at about their old location (cells depending on age can be extremely fragile so jostling these about is a really bad practice).
     
  8. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    Yeah make a new nuc with the old queen quick!
     
  9. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    typically to avoid swarming prior to the appearance of swarm cells , you have to provide queen with egg laying space the workers with sufficient clustering space and lastly enough space for honey storage any manipulations that you do that's achieve those goals will greatly reduce swarming .Barry
     
  10. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Allow me to add one more item--keep the hive from "overheating" by allowing enough room for aeration---open the front entrance fully and if really crowded, you can move the upper super back slightly, so that there is an extra entrance up above. This not only increases aeration but it also reduces crowding in the brood box by allowing the field bees direct access to the storage combs without having to work their way up through the brood box.
    When the swarming season passes and things quiet down, it's easy enough to move the top super forward and close the extra entrance.