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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For most of us, tonight and tomorrow night will have us experience temperatures in the mid to low 20's, this proceeded some of what by any stretch of the imagination, would be called a " mild to warm ", winter. For most of us, the queen has started to rapidly expand the brood nest well beyond what would normally be covered by the winter cluster. I know that low temps can kill off the brood if prolonged exposure happens. So how low a temperature and for how long would brood have to be chilled before a kill off is experienced? If in the 20's outside would residual heat from the re-clustering bees be warm enough to save the brood on the frames just outside the cluster? :confused:
 

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excellent question and one for which I have no answer.

I would suspect (based on some experience I have had with queen cells) that at least pupae are much more hardy to colder temperatures than you might think.
 

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I wouldn't give it much worry. The bees will do what is necassary and rebound from what is lost. There is not much you can do or should do. Micromanagement of beehives will become overmanagement, w/ dire results.
 

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I too suspect they will be just fine. If your queen has been laying well, she'll quickly replace any brood that might get lost.

We expect a low of 11F tonight here in my town. =:cool:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
ouch!...throw another log on the fire lol
 

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I'd have been out there throwing blankets over my hives.... ahem. Well, I put sawdust over my sprouting lilies. I'm used to covering stuff for freezes. :roll:
 

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The only work that my hive got today was throwing out dead. 17 deg. yesterday morn and 20 this morning. Took a look into the entrance and the bottom screen was covered with dead. Come back this afternoon and only see about 25-30 dead laying on the ground. Guess the girls didn't want them stinking up the place.
 

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I had the same fear as Yote Shooter since I saw lots of fuzzy little ones orienting the day before this last freeze, but so far so good. I've seen only one or two dead ones being carried out and away by my foragers (they never drop them outside the door--they actually fly them out of the beeyard!).
 
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