Beekeeping Forums banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got a call for these, looks like they're in a few blocks. Hundreds of bees coming and going.
Any ideas how to get them out of there? I was thinking of a Hogan trap...

Wood Door Twig Building material Concrete Wood Door Wire Composite material Concrete
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
164 Posts
I look forward to hearing some answers on this one. I have seen others simply cut out the block with an angle grinder. That is not something that I would feel comfortable doing though.

James
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,162 Posts
As James said cut the block to do a cut out (not me either unless that is absolutely what the home owner wanted), or do a trap out.

With that building I would not worry about the copper line running in the block. Take a ball peen hammer and using the round end pop a hole in the hollow core of the block for a new entrance. Now seal up the hole where the copper tube is with silicone and maybe a small piece of screen wire if the hole is so large that the silicon will not stay in place, but seal it closed. Put your trap out cone in place and your bait hive.

easy peasy.......we look forward to your pics or better yet video!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
164 Posts
Great Idea, G3.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,996 Posts
I would examine the inside. They may be going all the way through and be between the rafters or floor joists, as the case may be.

Also, can the pipe be removed, or is it in use?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
978 Posts
I did a similar one last year or maybe the year before by simply putting the trapout cone around the pipe.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I thought about a trap out cone, but I have no access to brood yet, still a little chilly here for pulling a frame. Would the bees follow the pipe back into the cone and hive?
That's why I wanted to go the Hogan method, get some nurse bees out also. A cone would just collect the forages and drones. There are dozens of drones flying around also.
The pipe is in use, but the owner said she could reroute it, to give access to the hole.
The pipe does go into the cellar where bees are finding their way into. But no colony there, just a bunch of lost bees.
They're building in the block, no access to the walls as the footer is pretty solid.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
474 Posts
From what I understand of the Hogan trap you still need some brood to draw the queen and nurse bees to it. I would waite until you had some brood to use for a trap out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
That's right, I didn't want to trap out just the foragers by using a cone.
I wanted to try a Hogan style in order to get a more rounded start. (a little a everything)

thanks for the input
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
419 Posts
If the colony has been in the block wall for a while and you have some drawn comb to work with you could buy a queen and do both (it is clearly early enough in the season to consider).

Queens are a bit hard to find this time of year (all of them going into packages), but it would be worth calling around a bit.

My suggestion:

Start with a standard trap-out cone and an empty nuc with swarm lure. Add the queen 3-5 days later.
IME: They'll likely accept her.
http://www.beekeepingforums.com/threads/4126-OK-which-works-better-with-a-Trap-out

Once satisfied with the population from the trap-out, pull this nuc and reconfigure the set up so the bees enter and exit through a box (Hogan method) without a cone.

Give it a couple weeks to allow the purchased queen to start laying and the bees to start filling the comb in the new pass-through box. Then add a trap out cone to the inside of the box and frame of foreign brood from the first box of workers you trapped.

You'd get two hives out of this for your time, two boxes and the price of a queen. Plus pick up a bit of cash for the removal!
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top