Coincidence or something more?

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Tyro, Jun 5, 2011.

  1. Tyro

    Tyro Member

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    I installed nucs and queens into my deadouts about 2 weeks ago. I buy the frames of bees and brood, get queens separately and install them together. I let the bees release the queen themselves.

    I checked last week and all queens were out and laying except one - it had not been released yet. Much of the candy was gone, just not enough. So, I direct released her into the hive. All is well, right?

    I checked on that hive a few days ago and she is still in there, but hasn't laid an egg over at least 5 days. There were two supersedure cells started from the original brood on the frames (so I cut them).

    Now, here is my observation. It seems to me that when I have queens that do not get released in the way I described - they typically have done poorly or were superseded. Is this a coincidence or is the relative lack of 'commitment' by the bees to releasing the queen an indication of a poor or poorly bred queen? Perhaps she doesn't release the proper pheromones or a sufficient quantity of pheromones. I don't know - it just seems to me that I am starting to observe a pattern.

    Has anyone else noticed this?

    Mike
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Your assumption is correct. The bees know best. Cutting the queen cells out almost guarantees you a queenless hive that will die if nothing else is done. I never cut q-cells.
     

  3. Tyro

    Tyro Member

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    Well, normally, I don't cut the cells - but in this case I could be fairly certain that the brood they were built from was older (I was able to get a good look at the frames when I installed them - the brood was likely 2-4 days old at install and there were no eggs on the frame).

    My plan is to check to see if she is laying yet today or tomorrow. If not, they will get a frame of eggs from the neighboring hive.
     
  4. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    Tyro writes:
    I checked on that hive a few days ago and she is still in there, but hasn't laid an egg over at least 5 days. There were two supersedure cells started from the original brood on the frames (so I cut them).

    tecumseh:
    I assume you don't see the connection here??? Since this unit has cells significant started they have little interest in the packaged and mated queen. Thereby while in the introduction cage she is not attend well nor fed well. you are then surprised when once she is released (by you since the bees in the box have little interest in her) she does not start laying. A bit of thin feed usually gets the new queen fed up and laying in a pretty quick fashion.

    we loosely use terms like superscedure and swarm cells but mother nature is not always that simple. for myself I like to somewhat determine what is going on, consider the + and - of several course of action and then make an informed decision as to whether to leave or cut cells. most time if something really is incurable wrong then a hive that started one 'superscedure' cell can make another.
     
  5. LtlWilli

    LtlWilli New Member

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    I agree . If a hive has decided to supercede or swarm, it's their business---they know better than we do. I let Nature take it's course, trusting in God to keep it coming out right in the long run every time.
    LtlWilli