Collecting Pollen

Discussion in 'Products of the Hive' started by Dbure, Jan 27, 2012.

  1. Dbure

    Dbure New Member

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    I have been considering collecting pollen from my hives this year with a pollen trap. Has anyone here ever used them? What are the pros and cons if any? I have read that bee pollen is an excellent source of many vitamins and minerals and would be interested in more information. The thing I wonder about though is if any of the pollen coming from harmful plants can make one sick. :confused:
     
  2. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

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    Pollen is easy to collect. The greatest mistake is collecting too much and starving the hive.
    "Pollen ranges from 2.5% to 61% protein content." The conundrum is human consumption of pollen. Pollen is not digestible. We do react to the hard shell in the case of allergies and sensitivities.
    The high vitamin content of "bee bread" comes in the lactic fermentation after bees add their special ingredients and let it sit with honey on top. The pollen traps collect raw pollen not bee bread.
    Bees are also not as selective as you might have read. They will collect worthless pollen also.
    http://www.honeybee.com.au/Library/pollen/quantity.html

    Read More: http://www.esajournals.org/doi/abs/10.1 ... -9615(2000)070%5B0617%3AWGPCOP%5D2.0.CO%3B2
     

  3. Dbure

    Dbure New Member

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    Thank you Americsbeekeeper. :)
    In one of the many professional websites I have visited that sell products of the hive direct from the apiary, pollen was one of the items I came across. It was jarred for human consumption. It made me interested to know if anyone here had ever ventured into this. I would fear more that robbing too much of it would weaken an otherwise healthy hive and before I go too deep into this I will want to some further study. :thumbsup:
     
  4. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    The bees need pollen to raise brood and the more brood you have the better chance you have to get surplus honey, which i sell. I have many people ask for pollen every year and could make more money if i sold it, but i like to keep my hive strong. That's just my take. Jack
     
  5. Dbure

    Dbure New Member

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    Thanks Jack for your input. I have read that pollen can spoil too if not dried??? :confused: Would you think it feasible to save some of the pollen to feed back to the bees in pollen patties during winter? Or is it even worth the trouble?
     
  6. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    I let the bees cure and store it, they will find pollen (like in my area now) when nothing is blooming and everything looks dead, :confused: So i never worry about feeding pollen, unless in the early spring days when the weather permits and i don't find much in their hive. I've only had to feed pollen once in all my years of beekeeping. Guess i've been lucky. :thumbsup: Jack
     
  7. HoneyBee123

    HoneyBee123 New Member

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    The only problem would be pesticides, and that is not a minor one. But if you are thinking poisonous plants then I believe that the bees know best.
     
  8. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    I used to collect pollen and sell. Found it to be a hassle. I quit and waited to see what I had for repeat customers. I have had zero requests from people who have boughtin the past. Unlike honey who I have a good clientel built up. When I was collecting pollen I used sundance traps. I would also shut down the traps when corn tassled. The pollen off corn is of a lower quality than that of insect pollenated plants.