comb collapse

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by DLMKA, Jul 5, 2012.

  1. DLMKA

    DLMKA New Member

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    I had one in the last week. Hive is in full sun until arout 5pm where it gets some shade off the treeline right behind them. Was using wax foundation that is cross wired but doesn't have the vertical wires. It had started to sag shortly after they started building comb and filling it with nectar/honey but this heatwave was just too much. Collapsed right inside the hand hold on the box where the wood is thin. I'm going to cut some plywood to put over the top cover to provide some shade during the hottest part of the day.
     
  2. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    is this a outside frame? position 10 or 1? Is this colony adequate ventilated?, do you have water available for them to air condition with. I was using vertically wired wax foundation while in Upstate NY, we had many a day in the mid 90's. As here all my hives were in full sun, to maximize sunlight in the winter. Never had comb sag as described. Usually the bees work top to bottom expanding to side rails. If comb is attached to top bar, how could it collapse? Truly melting comb in a colony that has adequate ventilation, and water readily available and is a strong colony the heat really isn't much a issue unless were are talking:
    1.) weak to moderate sized colony covering too many frames to properly ventilate.
    2.) Heat is truly extreme like in the 100's
    3.) little or no ventilation available
    Barry
     

  3. DLMKA

    DLMKA New Member

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    yeah, the frame was 1 or 10 position facing due east. It was a small swarm I caught earlier this year that is just growing out of a single deep hive body. The foundation doesn't have the vertical wires which I'm never going to use again especially in a deep frame. They do have a pond to get water from about 300 yards ENE but it's getting shallow, about a foot deep now and will probably dry up in the next few weeks. I'm going to put some hog pans out with water closer to the hives and probably put a top feeder on this hive with 1:1 syrup in one well and water in the other.

    It got to 102F yesterday here and the forecast high is 102 for today and tomorrow too.
     
  4. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    I guess i'm just lucky, i had 7 med. supers(ten framers) out on the picnic table in full sun that i put there after extracting them. The temp. for the last week has ranged from 99F to 105F and i left them there for three days for the girls to clean up. The comb is intact,clean, and dry.:thumbsup: Jack
     
  5. DLMKA

    DLMKA New Member

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    The comb won't be stressed as much when it's not full of honey.
     
  6. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    While weight has something to do with it, more to do with it is your colony is in all probability too small to properly air-condition what they have. I mentioned vertically wired, use pins on the side bars to keep straight, bowing or collapsing never occurred. I believe your thinking of horizontal wired. Know that bees will more readily work wax before plastic coated with wax.
    Barry
     
  7. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    DLMKA- does your hive have any top openings that can be used by the bees to ventilate the hive and for hot air to leave the hive?
     
  8. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I have found here in extreme heat a couple of things seem to help more than anything else. some of the list will be redundant given the prior responses.

    1) a small slot for a top entrance or adding a "tecumseh's stick" (patent pending) or shim to vent the top of the stack helps quite a great deal.

    2) removing one frame per box seems to greatly help ventilation up thru the stack.

    3) adding almost anything on top of the hive to somewhat shield the hive from the noon day sun can greatly reduces the heat load.... I primarily use very old and decaying migratory hive tops for this purpose here. typically I add a brick to the old cover to keep any wind from blowing this away. I have also used discard pieces of foam insulation board and scraps of plywood for the same purpose.

    4) if you use various color of paint for boxes and tops one of the underlying benefits of white paint become quite apparent.