combine laying workers with weak but queenright hive?

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Tyro, May 3, 2012.

  1. Tyro

    Tyro Member

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    I have a hive that failed to throw a queen. Now it has gone 'laying worker'. Normally, in cases like this, I just dump the bees. It is usually more trouble and expense than it is worth to try to get them 'right'. However, I also have a recent split that is queenright - but is weak. I think that it was chilled and lost a fair amount of brood.

    I have brood frames from other hives that I can give it to boost it. However, I am wondering if it is possible to successfully combine it with the laying worker hive - in an effort to minimize loss and maximize my resources.

    I don't want to lose the good queen though.

    Can this be done successfully and if so, how?

    Thanks
    Mike
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Carry the laying worker hive to the weak one. Open it and shake the bees from each frame onto the ground in front of the weak hive. Let the bees find there way into the weak hive. Put the woodenware away for 24 hours. Then add it to the hive if needed.
     

  3. Tyro

    Tyro Member

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    Thank Iddee!

    Now I have another question for you all: I know how a queenless hive behaves and I know how a queen-right hive acts. So does a hive taken over by the laying workers act content - as though it were queen-right, or is it ornery like a queenless hive?

    Thanks

    Mike
     
  4. dr.buzz

    dr.buzz New Member

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    They think they are queen right, which is why you can't just introduce a queen to a laying worker hive, they'll kill the queen. So I wouldn't imagine you'd be able to tell from their behavior that they have laying workers. I've never had that situation occur so I'm not saying this from experience, just from what I've read.
     
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    in my experience they tend to be nervous and stingy. actually they should be tagged as a laying workers hive and not a laying worker hive.

    I myself would knock the bees out somewhere at the edge of the apiary and keep adding bees via brood in the manner you described.
     
  6. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    I tried something yesterday with a laying worker hive. I found one of my hives about to swarm and had four frames with swarm cells. I put an empty hive (with drawn comb) where the laying worker hive was and one frame with two capped queen cells, i took the laying worker hive 300 ft away and shook all the bees out. I took their hive (two med. super boxes) and put them on two strong hives that needed more room (they had four frames of scattered drone brood and eggs) the rest of the frames were empty except for some uncapped nectar. Any idea what you think will happen.:grin: Oh, i found the queen in the swarm hive,put her in a nuc and made two more nuc's with the other frames with queen cells, and left a frame with two queen cells in the mother hive.:roll: That's all i need, two more hives to take care of. Jack
     
  7. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Sounds good to me Jack, don't think I would have done much different! :thumbsup: Unless you really don't want those two extra hives to take care of, but then shipping would be brutal! :lol: