Comments in FBM Video

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Yankee11, Jul 12, 2013.

  1. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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  2. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    I would take into consideration your geographical location.

    I would think Perry will have some issues if he follows these guidelines.
     

  3. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    True,

    Little Rock is about that same as Atlanta. The time of year would vary for different places, but it's the idea of pulling all the honey from brood chambers before the fall flow starts.
    Kinda makes since. I know my brood boxes are filling up with honey now. I have one hive that is queenless at the moment and has capped queen cells due to hatch any day.
    I looked through the brood box and every frame that is pulled, is full on honey as well as the super. When queen hatches and mates she will have no where to lay. I have to address
    that situation soon.
     
  4. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    I do not disagree with Don on removing honey frames from the brood chamber if it is becoming honey-bound. Up here however, "every drop" is not something I would consider. It is all geographical like G3 said.
     
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    like a lot of advice in the virtual beekeeping community... what works in one place will prove to be a disaster not that far away.
     
  6. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    I'm pulling honey from the brood chambers of my 3 strongest hives granted it's just 1 or 2 frames. I'm going to make up 3 nucs to try and overwinter.

    :clapping:1000!:guitarplayer:
     
  7. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    congrads on passing the 1000 mark Eddy.
     
  8. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    in regards to the thread I will mention that if you utilize the procedure in using an excluder in Jerry Hayes article 'is a queen excluder a honey excluder' (1985 or so ABJ article) you will likely discover that in the brood nest itself there will be little to almost no honey stored there. at least that was my own experience when I replicated this experiment. so via this process there is no need to remove honey from the brood nest since it will not have any honey there anyway.

    years ago while keeping bees in North Dakota we routinely did as this this thread suggest and it was routinely called 'stripping the hive'. we did this just prior to moving the hive back south so 1)it somewhat reduced the load (512 X 10 pounds) and 2) we had plenty of partial feed frames to take their place and 3) once they reached the other end of the line and had set for about a month any hives short on feed would get at least one round of feed.
     
  9. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    I approach it a little differently I will take out the frames with honey put the desired number of frames for brood that I want in the hive 6 or 7 in the bottom super and 6 in the top and if there is not enough brood frames for that amount of brood then I will install empty frames for the Queen to lay and move the honey frames up or take them away.

    What concerns me in the video is the 100 hives in one yard. I realize that some are nucs and singles from nucs, and you use the yard for teaching but I don’t know of many areas that have enough of a diverse forage to support that number of colonies year around. So a lot of feeding is needed for the colonies to reach their full potential. In my experience and humble opinion it is important to look at an area and only place the number of colonies that an area can support any more than that and you, the bees, are working against yourself. Why settle for a 50 lb average on 100 colonies when with 40 well cared for colonies you could average 120 lbs.

    Only strip honey if you are guaranteed the bees will be able to collect all their hive requirments in the late summer and fall because if the bees can’t, being gready at this time of year could cause the colony to not have the needed stores for winter. Also if for some reason there is not a flow or good weather so the bees are stimulated to raise brood for the bees needed to over winter with.
     
  10. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a snip...
    What concerns me in the video is the 100 hives in one yard.

    tecumseh...
    you know what is interesting is I did not even notice that detail. although I agree with your premise no one can know the capacity of an area until they have direct experience in the area itself. there are lot of commercial migratory beekeepers who do keep bees in yards that may number 60 to 100, but your are absolutely correct in that without a syrup bucket these kinds of numbers would not be sustainable.

    long ago I asked one of my commercial mentors how to know where to set down bees and how many and he simply said.... 'follow along behind a successful beekeeper who has been in an area for 20 years and set down next to him and in the same number'.... <warning here DO NOT do this unless you are also comfortable with folks speaking bad about you in polite company and commonly using your name as a bit of profanity in church.
     
  11. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    If I remember right, he lost around 100 nucs to vandals this spring, too.