Corn Planting Drift is Killing Honey Bees. You Can Help. Here’s How.

Discussion in 'Bee News' started by Iddee, May 11, 2012.

  1. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    The number of beekills this spring due to poisoning by pesticides has skyrocketed. In Ohio just this spring we have seen more beekills than I can remember total in the past 25 years combined. Reports from many, many states have been coming into this office in the past couple of weeks. At first they seemed isolated and unsupported. Beekeepers are wary of reporting incidents, and seldom sure of how to proceed or what to do.
    The incidents this spring are not the symptoms reported commonly as Colony Collapse Disorder, where bees disappear and a beekeeper returns to what had been a strong healthy hive only weeks before and what’s left is simply lots of brood, a handful of young bees and a queen…if anybody is home at all.
    No, the incidents this spring are different…they harken back to the days of massive beekills, when plants in bloom were sprayed on a routine basis, when beekeepers would find entire apiaries wiped out, with pounds and pounds of dead bees, twisting, writhing and dying in front of their hives. Piles of dead, stinking bees were common then, but with the advent of more restrictive regulations and safer-to-use pesticides, much, but not all, of that death-by-pesticide era has gone away.
    Until now. This spring the ugly past has returned. We were warned though. Purdue researchers saw this problem last year and brought it to everybody’s attention. Then they looked deeper and further and saw that it wasn’t just a flook, an accident, an anomaly, but rather it has turned into an epidemic. And they brought that to our attention too.



    http://home.ezezine.com/1636/1636-2012.05.11.14.40.archive.html
     
  2. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a snip..
    The incidents this spring are not the symptoms reported commonly as Colony Collapse Disorder

    tecumseh:
    at this point this sounds a bit far fetched to me. maybe it is just me but there appears to be a very massive disconnect between how stuff works and the evidence at hand. massive bee kills where large number of bodies are found at or near the hives are typically not associated with planting corn but some general and wide spread spraying which generally is never done at the time when corn seed is placed into the ground. you might expect some herbicide to be sprayed at this time but the interaction between that stuff and a bee hives is very subtle.
     

  3. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    The fact that masses of bees seem to be exhibiting signs of pesticide poisoning at a time in Spring soon after corn is planted and when most traditional spraying of crops is not done, is the very reason they are suspecting that the pesticide coating of the corn seed. That seed-coating pesticide is sticky, so the treated seed is additionally coated with talc powder to allow it to not stick in the planting machinery. The pesticide loaded talc then gets blown into the air in clouds by the farm machinery while planting the seeds. They've already shown in studies that the pesticide from the treated corn seed talc is blown far over neighboring areas and coats everything as it gets blown by the wind. This type of contamination was not anticipated by the pesticide-coated seed producers, and could indeed have way more widespread toxic consequences than 'traditionally' sprayed crops. We are talking pesticide, not herbicide. None of this seems far-fetched to me, it seems pretty obvious and logical cause and effect, but it's also being backed by new studies for example from Harvard. These are not crackpot tree huggers presenting this new damning evidence.

    The question is how much pesticide (insect killing poison) in the environment is still relatively harmless to bees (and to us for that matter!) when present on plants, flowers, and in the air and water? How much pesticide, how widespread, and how of many different kinds and concentrations- what is the upper threshold that bees are able to reasonably tolerate before they begin to get sick and die off en masse along with the intended 'target insects'? With the creation of systemic pesticides via coated seed and neonicitinoid pesticides, I feel we have passed that upper threshold of what the bees can tolerate and still remain 'healthy enough' to thrive.
     
  4. jb63

    jb63 New Member

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    Chemical engineers are so smart.If they keep doing such a good job pollination prices will be over two hundred dollars per hive.
     
  5. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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