Curious Mind Thing

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by lazy shooter, Feb 3, 2013.

  1. lazy shooter

    lazy shooter New Member

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    I have one small nuc that did not do as well as it's twin nuc did last summer and fall. Could I order a package of bees and combine them with this nuc? Could I kill the poor queen and install a package above the existing nuc and do a newspaper combine? Or would it be best to order a package and do a newspaper combine with the two nucs?
     
  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Why not just replace the existing queen? Much cheaper.
     

  3. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Since this is just a nuc and spring is right around the corner, I would play with it a little. If you think you have a failing queen in the nic for some reason just pinch her and put in a frame of eggs. You can watch them raise several queens and might even be able to harvest and use some of the queen cells.
     
  4. lazy shooter

    lazy shooter New Member

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    PerryBee:

    If honey was the major goal, would it be better to combine these two nucs into one large colony? I could still order more bees for the other boxes.
     
  5. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    I am thinking that last year you had 2 nucs, one of which did well and one not so well. If the one that did not do so well is still alive and spring is around the corner, I would just requeen it. Like G3 says you could let them requeen themselves with some eggs from your good hive, but if honey is your goal, I would not wait the 28 + days to get brood going and would just purchase a laying queen.
    If money is no object you could order a package but I'm cheap (I went to Iddee-Jack-tec University).
    If you have an established hive and a good nuc going by spring you should be in the honey in no time (weather permitting of course, that is the one variable we can't do much about). :wink:
     
  6. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    Courious Mind Thing......

    good thing us keeps don't have to be good SPELLARS......:lol:
    but then again, my COURIOUS mind had to read this COURIOUS thread......:lol:

    shooter, what perry said, if your goal is honey, i also would not want to wait for the girls to requeen themselves, this is time consuming, so i would re queen her with a good laying queen to get them off and running right away. as far as combining the weak nuc with the strong nuc, i would be hesitant to do this in the spring unless there are not enough bees, sometimes my thought process when it comes to bees, is, leave well enough alone. don't risk messing up a good hive to save a weak hive, i guess is what i am getting at. many variables with this though, so just a thought. i would also be hesitant to combine the weak nuc with package bees. you have girls that have been around all winter (older bees can be fussy things), a package put together and hived is total chaos....you are combining disoriented new bees with old fussy type girls,you might risk losing your package queen....just my thoughts.

    also, i would order a package of bees anyway if you have the equipment so 3 hives!
    just me, my goal is always more bees and more honey......and you know i hoard bees :grin:
     
  7. lazy shooter

    lazy shooter New Member

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    Danged Spell Checker didn't work in the heading. I r an inguneer and don't do speling.

    Thanks for all of your replies. I am going to order a queen from BWeaver tomorrow.

    I have three other mature hives that should make honey this spring. Of course, that depends on some rain. Oh well, there are precious few slam-dunks in life. Thanks again,

    Lazy
     
  8. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    another consideration....
    queens from bweaver are at least about 60 days away. if the 'weak' hive didn't perk up at the first nectar and pollen flow I would combine and then when I got a new queen I would make a split from the combined hive. most likely the stronger queen can benefit from the extra bees and feed and then in 60 days you should have three issues of young healthy bees to start over. at that point in the season a robust hive will barely miss the 3 or so frames of bees and brood that you pull from it to make up the new nuc.
     
  9. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    Courious Mind Thing

    "Danged Spell Checker didn't work in the heading. I r an inguneer and don't do speling."

    :lol:
    lazy.....you should have left that header alone.....:lol:

    anyway best wishes to you an 'inguneer who don't do no speling' BUT loves and keeps bees.....:grin:
    and that queen from bweaver.

    "I have three other mature hives that should make honey this spring. Of course, that depends on some rain. Oh well, there are precious few slam-dunks in life."

    ain't that the truth, and that's what makes it worth it all...
     
  10. Zulu

    Zulu Member

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    With all the build up in Florida, there must be Queens ready down there , if not now, very soon.?? Or not ??
     
  11. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    in the average year there is about a 30 day jump for the Florida folks or anyone rearing queens in the very south most part of Louisiana relative to the first queens available here. I would guess no matter where you might obtain a queen you are (unless you pass significant cash under the table) pointed to the very back of the line when you do place your order.