Cut comb honey production

Discussion in 'Bees' started by riverbee, May 17, 2011.

  1. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

    Messages:
    3,048
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    hey all,
    I put together a slide show on my method of producing cut comb honey for beekeepers that are interested in producing comb honey for the first time, with minimal expense, using equipment you already have. I learned this method from old timers and continue to use foundationless frames to produce comb honey. This is a great method to use, and a great way to get started, especially if you are interested in producing cut comb honey for the first time and don’t want to invest in extra, expensive equipment. This method works very well.

    [video=youtube;xval9IFV2_I]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xval9IFV2_I&feature=player_detailpage[/video]

    Enjoy and happy beekeeping!
     
  2. bamabww

    bamabww New Member

    Messages:
    1,016
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    riverbee,

    Very interesting and thanks for the info. Enjoyed your photos.

    You mentioned using an 8 frame but it should work in a 10 frame as well, don't you think?
     

  3. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

    Messages:
    1,399
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Excellent info! Thank you for sharing.
    (and I LOVE your trademark quote!)
     
  4. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

    Messages:
    3,048
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    bamabww,

    this works well with 9 frame medium supers as well....10 frame might be a little tight and your comb would be very thin, but worth a try. with 10 frames, and a very strong hive, i would be tempted to place 2 frames in, or add another right after the 1st one is removed, if you have a good floral source going.

    let me know if you try it!

    also, the bees spend time filling in the grooves of the new frames, so i started putting a bead of wax to fill it in so the girls aren't spending time waxing that up.
     
  5. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

    Messages:
    3,048
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Anyone For Trying Comb Honey This Season?

    i thought i'd revive this thread, and am curious if anyone else is trying their keeping skills for comb honey this season?

    also, this is a good thread to read on it:

    making comb honey
    started by fatbeeman, if someone has an additional link to another thread on comb honey, please post, and also, for those of us who produce comb honey, please share your method as well.

    this is don's method, i thought i would add it here:

    [video=youtube;Dl9iGjP_Lu4]http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=Dl9iGjP_Lu4[/video]
     
  6. Minz

    Minz Member

    Messages:
    187
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Tried you view your video and it said it was private.
     
  7. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

    Messages:
    3,048
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    thanks minz, i fixed the listing.
     
  8. Minz

    Minz Member

    Messages:
    187
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Nice slide show. I did regular foundation last year and found it to be a bit ‘solid’. This year I went with some thin foundation from ML in shallows. I will see how it works.
     
  9. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

    Messages:
    3,048
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    minz, thanks. i have never used the thin foundation, just always used foundationless frames in mediums. i think tecumseh might? anyway, how many frames are in your shallows?
     
  10. Minz

    Minz Member

    Messages:
    187
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    I use a full 10
     
  11. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

    Messages:
    3,048
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    just my HO minz, you will have thicker comb if you use 9 frames vs 10.
     
  12. Minz

    Minz Member

    Messages:
    187
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    I built a 9 frame spacer some years ago out of a piece of aluminum. I guess I forgot about it. I am going to super up a hive this evening with a shallow on thin foundation. I will dig that out and give it a try (as if it needs to be exact). I have moved 2 hives into a subdivision surrounded by a couple of hundred acres of some sort of raspberry farm, not certain what is going to happen when the raspberries bloom but the dandelions between rows was an eye opener.
     
  13. Minz

    Minz Member

    Messages:
    187
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    River, never thought to ask what do you do with your frames after harvest? Without foundation you probably just put them right back in and skip the problem/ cost of foundation and wire?
     
  14. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

    Messages:
    3,048
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    minz, i run 8 frames in my mediums, depending on the flow and strength of the hive, two empty frames will be added off center. i have 8 and 9 frame spacing tools, but often times these get left behind, the 8 framer is nice and quick to space the mediums. anyway i wind up spacing equally without it. if a flow is strong, and looks to be good, when i remove an empty frame, another goes in it's place. if i think the flow is going to quit or it's later in the season, i will just replace the empty frame with a drawn comb frame. you will like the thicker comb. also, just a thought, keep an eye on the center frame/s as they fill them, move them out of the center, some timing on this, you want them to finish and cap the frame, but these center frame/s will get more tracked and stained with travel than the others if left in place.
     
  15. Minz

    Minz Member

    Messages:
    187
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    River, I will be in Milwaukee this next week for a couple of days. I looked you up on the map but your closer to Minnesota than MKE!
    I went back to the yard on the hive I dropped and the berries are blooming! The deep I added on Apr 24 was 100% drawn. I put the shallow with thin foundation on (spaced at 9 frames). My homemade frame spacer did not really work. The edges were too short so I spaced them by hand. I put a second deep on the dink hive. They are kind of hot.
    I like your idea on shallow frames. I built 7 shallows, and 11 new deeps because that was the width of the lumber that I had. I bought 100 frames of each to get the price break. It just seems that I do not have enough of anything to keep ahead of the bees in this crazy weather year. I am thinking I could break out the wedge and go foundationless and put them between frames!
     
  16. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

    Messages:
    3,048
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    yeah minz, MKE is about a 4 1/2 -5 hour drive east of me, i'm about an hour from the MN border. if i was going to MKE, it would be see a brewers game......:lol:
    well ok, i'd also bee inclined to meet a keep who lives in boring, oregon...:grin:
    (have a sister out that way)

    seems i remember you are from or have family here in wisconnie?
    anyways, i wouldn't worry about the spacer and getting the space exact, what you did was fine, i do it all the time. what kind of crazy weather are you getting? good nectar flows? you ought to be here, dandelions aren't even blooming, and the snow just melted off. if you have a good nectar flow, the bees will fill your comb honey frames out well. now just cuz i said that.......:lol:
     
  17. Minz

    Minz Member

    Messages:
    187
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Yeah grew up in Wisconsin, Navy showed me that there are places you do not sweat all summer and shovel snow all winter!
    We are 15 degrees above normal, weeks at a time without rain and flows are running into flows. I have had more foundation drawn out in the last month than the last two years (pretty close). Now I am on a small yard with acres of blooming raspberries! I was bummed out when the neighbor said I needed to reduce but it has really turned out great by spreading my bees all over the county.
    Out for a wedding but the brewers are not playing! I do plan to go a little west to meet Crazy Roland. I guess I am obsessive.
     
  18. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

    Messages:
    728
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    UK style cut comb

    If the conditions are right, I try to produce a dedicated super of comb honey each year. I use 10 frames (wider spaced) in an 11 frame super. I use thin foundation and alternate full sheets with starter strips (less chance of wild comb).

    When cutting the comb I choose the best side to be visible when packed. To avoid label damage, I store packs without labels in the freezer.
     
  19. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

    Messages:
    3,048
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    minz-
    "Yeah grew up in Wisconsin, Navy showed me that there are places you do not sweat all summer and shovel snow all winter!"
    :lol:

    barbarian-
    "To avoid label damage, I store packs without labels in the freezer."

    barbarian, what type of label are you using? i make my own printed out in color on heavy card stock. i spray the sheet with a light coating two or three times, (or individual labels) with an acrylic coating; Krylon Crystal Clear. it is a permanent protective coating, does not yellow the label, does not run any colors, is very resistant to moisture, (won't ruin the label), and i can place the label on my packages and store in the freezer, so they are ready to go. i do store my cut comb honey after packaging and labeling, in individual ziplocs. this coating works great and i have never had a problem with moisture ruining my labels now.

    ps, i spray both sides of the sheet/label
     
    Last edited: May 10, 2013