Cutout interrupted a swarm, what do I have now?

Discussion in 'Swarms, Cut outs, and Trap outs' started by beekeeperbrownie, May 29, 2013.

  1. beekeeperbrownie

    beekeeperbrownie New Member

    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hello all

    Thanks for all the information you all share, it is super helpful. I did a cutout on Memorial Day. I looked at it on Saturday, coming and going from a house wall. Sunday the homeowner called saying there was a cloud of bees flying all of a sudden...the sky was black with bees. It was about to rain and did, they collected on the wall and went back in. I came and cut out the hive the next day. It was an incredibly hard to get at hive and I didn't find the queen but I did find 8 or more capped queen cells and a few hatched out cells. I sucked them up with a Robo style bee vac and left them overnight. Tuesday I brought them home and checked over what I had. They were really active and flying all over the place when I opened the hive but didn't collect up anywhere like a swarm. I found all but two queen cells opened and a young queen which I put in a clip. I swear I found another but by the time I got the clip, I couldnt find her again (I begin to doubt myself).

    Here's the thing I don't understand....there was no interest by any other bees to the queen in the cage. Did I interrupt an afterswarm? There was capped brood but no eggs. The neighbor said there was a swarm two weeks ago, presumably from this hive. What do you think I have here? What happened to all the queens in the queen cells? If I still have the queen that was originally trying to swarm and I kept that from happening, what do you think will happen next? Will they still swarm?

    --Brownie
    ps there were more drones in this hive than I have ever seen!
     
  2. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

    Messages:
    3,708
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Welcome to the forum Brownie. :hi:
    You seem to be a practical individual---down to business straight-away, no introductions. That's just fine---you're still most welcome here questions and all. :grin:
    1. I swear I found another but by the time I got the clip, I couldnt find her again (I begin to doubt myself). You probably did but virgin queens are very speedy and can "disappear" in the blink of an eye.
    2.
    ..there was no interest by any other bees to the queen in the cage. The behavior of the bees to virgin queens is as if she's "just one of the girls". Only after she's mated do they start to show her any "respect".
    3.
    Did I interrupt an afterswarm? Very possibly. You could have totally missed the emergence of the prime swarm which left with the old queen who left behind unopened queen cells.
    4.
    What happened to all the queens in the queen cells? It's most likely that the first one(s) to emerge destroyed the latecomers.
    5.
    If I still have the queen that was originally trying to swarm (not likely) and I kept that from happening, what do you think will happen next? Will they still swarm? Your guess is as good as mine.

    Let's hear what the other members of the forum answer to your questions. Opinions often are quite varied.
    Keep asking questions.
     

  3. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

    Messages:
    2,060
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    If you had left the cutout alone the queens would have fought it out for survival. the bees in the hive will deside if they are going to protect more than one queen and so leave as a cast swarm with an unmated queen. having moved the bees and giving them more space and repairs to the comb I doubt that they would have produced cast swarms. leave them alone for 2 weeks so the queen can get mated with out being disturbed.
     
  4. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

    Messages:
    2,060
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Welcome I mist it was your first post.
     
  5. pturley

    pturley New Member

    Messages:
    419
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    The act of moving them into your hive is essentially an "artificial swarm". Provided enough space, you likely will have stopped/satisfied the swarming instincts for now. If it were a virgin queen (due to the prior swarm), then either she is newly bred, or she will make mating flights from your hive.

    The same thing happened to me in a cut-out on May 14th. I transferred several mature queen cells with a huge number of bees and captured the original queen in the cut-out. During the week following, she tore down all of the mature queen cells and is now laying like a machine!

    Inspect the hive well over the coming weeks for eggs and brood. If found, then all is well.

    If not, either check their response to a caged queen again, or simply add a frame of eggs from an existing hive to give them what they need to raise their own.
     
  6. beekeeperbrownie

    beekeeperbrownie New Member

    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    efmesch :grin: I have a tendency to do that...single track mind. I am from Illinois, USA and have had bees for a couple of years (and have read about ten years worth of knowledge on forums like this) I spend an insane amount of time trying to everything I can. I have done a couple of cutouts now and have experimented with nucs and splits. I have 9 hives right now. I really have no close mentor or other beekeepers in my area so thanks to you and others for your knowledge!
     
  7. beekeeperbrownie

    beekeeperbrownie New Member

    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I went ahead and put the frame I was holding with the speedy vanishing mirage of a queen, along with another capped queen cell, brood etc in a nuc. I figured what the heck, I'd see what would happen. These cutouts with rubberbanded comb have edges, nooks and crannies and it is difficult to spot queens
     
  8. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

    Messages:
    1,249
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Welcome brownie.
    You've found the friendliest beekeeping forum around.
    Sounds like you are on the right track, putting the nuc together. Leave it alone for a couple of weeks, and then see what the bees have done. They'll work things out.
    If you get a minute go to the introductions thread and tell us a little about yourself.
    Again, welcome and we hope you enjoy your time here with us.
     
  9. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

    Messages:
    3,048
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    hi brownie!~
    "I spend an insane amount of time trying to everything I can"
    we all do, ask our spouses........they have plenty to say about our obsession.....:lol:

    "I really have no close mentor or other beekeepers in my area so thanks to you and others for your knowledge!"
    so your bees will be your teacher/mentors, but speak a different language than we do......ask perry and jack..........:lol:

    btw brownie, where are you in central illinois? welcome to the forum! and couldn't have said it any better than gunsmith:
    "You've found the friendliest beekeeping forum around.
    Sounds like you are on the right track, putting the nuc together. Leave it alone for a couple of weeks, and then see what the bees have done. They'll work things out. If you get a minute go to the introductions thread and tell us a little about yourself.
    Again, welcome and we hope you enjoy your time here with us.
    "

    :grin:
     
  10. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

    Messages:
    5,829
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Well, not much I can add to what's been offered, other than...................


    WELCOME! :hi: