da rat scenario #3

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by riverrat, Aug 19, 2010.

  1. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    You have 15 hives that have 2 supers each on them some capped and some partially capped. You pull all the supers and start extracting the 30 supers of honey. Your right in the heart of a small hive beetle area. Its going to take you 8 to 10 days in your spare time to extract all the supers. You have a refractometer since the old timers said you need to keep a check on the moisture levels in the honey But didnt bother to tell ya what to do if the moisture was to high. you start checking and you got some supers comming in at 20 % moisture and some at 14% and the rest hitting about 16.5%. Then after the 4th day of extracting you start to notice small larva in the cappings while you are using the uncaping knife. Oh wait on your 8th super you noticed you didnt get all the bees out of the super there is a small patch of drone brood in the super and low and behold there is the queen you have no idea what hive this super came off of. How we going to solve all the problems that just came up in the honey house. Your a 2nd year keep and starting to find out beekeeping is more work then you ever imagined. Need answers on the moisture larva and queen problems. :beg:
     
  2. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    Brain hurting !!!!!!!!! :shock:
     

  3. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

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    On the Moisture problem - combine the honey from the too moist batch with the dry batches. If it still comes out too moist, use a dehumidifier.

    On the Larva problem - freeze all affected frames / supers immediately for 48 hours to kill the larva, then feed that honey back to the bees after thawing (yes, I know it could probably be saved, but your reputation wouldn't be salvagable if your customers found out you were selling them honey that once had SHB larva in it). A reputation is far more valuable than the honey would have been. Let the loss of revenue serve as a reminder to freeze the frames when pulling them then bag them until you have a chance to extract.

    On the queen - check each hive for eggs, if only one hive has no eggs in it, that hive is the one the queen was taken from. Check the emergency queen cells, if they seem to be raising a replacement, make a new colony using that queen and frames of bees/larva from any hives that could spare them, utilizing newspaper combines to make sure everyone's happy and the queen doesn't get killed.

    On the brood in the honey super - cut the section of comb containing the brood out of the frame then extract as normal or return it to a hive to let the bees clean out the surely dead by this time brood.
     
  4. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    way to go stay tuned for the next. The only thing i would have done different is not pull any more supers than I can extract in 2 days well done. tune in later I will have another tonight. I think this one will eal with natural beekeeping with no chemicals and problems with the hives. Is everyone enjoying this and learning. I need input