Day 8 and Question

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Fred & Shelley's Bees, May 24, 2012.

  1. Fred & Shelley's Bees

    Fred & Shelley's Bees New Member

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    So it's been peeing for days here. Really puts a damper on the bee watching. It cleared enough yesterday for Fred to get up on the roof and fill the feeder. During that brief bit of sun he comment that a bunch of the bees were coming in with, "big yellow things on their back legs. Are they sick?" :rolling: Um, no sweety, if I remember elementary school science that would be pollen. I should mention that I really want to get up close and personal, but don't do heights. So I shout useful stuff from the ground usually beginning with, "Google says..."

    Today was nice and sunny so Fred was able to get up and do a better check on the girls. Someone mentioned in my earlier post about removing the second hive box for now as there really wasn't enough bees to need the extra space - Good Advice! They had done nothing on the bottom and all moved upstairs. Frames 3-7 were getting comb on them. Anywhere from 1/2 to 2/3rds full of comb. So we just removed the bottom box for now. Here is where it's a bit weird. Didn't get the frames pushed together enough and on frame 5 it's all weird and thick as well. Is this a problem? Or just leave it alone they'll sort it out?
    Shelley's Pictures 274.jpg

    We also found the Queen! Queen Bee.jpg

    They'd nearly drained the sugar syrup again, so we topped that up and I'm off to take a beginner bee keeping course on Saturday. Should be fun!

    Shelley
     
  2. DonMcJr

    DonMcJr New Member

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    Cool pics! Glad to see everything is going well! I'm a newbie but my guess from my reading is that's either drone cells or burr comb you'll need to remove. But don't quote me on that....wait for a more experienced beek to answer.

    Do you have was foundation or plasticell?

    Actually...I looked again was that where the queen cage was hanging and the frames were further apart because of the cage? If so its Probally burr comb from the gap created from the cage...
     

  3. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    If I read your picture corrrectly, the bees have built a "frameless" comb, supported by being attached at the top to the frame being held. If that is corrrect, the best thing to do (in spite of not wanting to waste some beautiful new comb) would be to remove it entirely and place the frame back into the hive, placed close up next the the adjacent frame. This should be done as soon as possible so as to avoid the waste of eggs/brood, should the queen start to lay there, or the loss of honey, should they start storing there. The bees will build nicely on the properly space foundation of the next frame.
    The whole beauty of the Langstroth system is the flexibility of working with combs in frames. If you have a comb not in a frame, you lose the ability to manipulate it, examine the cells inbetween and the connections eventually will break and cause a mess inside the hive.
     
  4. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a snip...
    Here is where it's a bit weird. Didn't get the frames pushed together enough and on frame 5 it's all weird and thick as well. Is this a problem?

    tecumseh:
    either a bit of extra comb attached randomly to the frame or often another bit of comb can be removed. a better guess is you did not keep spacing exactly correct so when they built this comb it end up being extra thick..... typically I resolve these issues by shoving the frames tightly together (while they are drawing come from it's foundation base) and if necessary reshape (flatten) the fat parts of the comb with my hive tool.

    mistakes will be made... ALMOST all of these can be corrected.
     
  5. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    I had that very thing happen to me, bees drew out their own foundation, over top of the foundation I provided. eventually they did fully attach it to the proper ( foundation provided ) and all went well kinda disconcerting seeing the girls running up the back side of the freshly drawn one sided comb and seeing the provided foundation nearly vacant of comb. I always make it a practice to use all ten frames, and equally space # 1 and # 10 frame from the outside brood chamber walls. This squeezes the frames tightly together and allows for slightly wider outside frames as the bees drawn all the frames out.
    Barry
     
  6. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    "So it's been peeing for days here". Ahhhhh, the lower mainland, beautiful seasons there, all 2 of them. Rainy season, and the other one! :lol:

    Nice looking picture of the queen. If you are taking the beek course, shouldn't the hive be down where you get to work it? :wink:

    Say "Hi" to Donny for me if he's teaching.
     
  7. Fred & Shelley's Bees

    Fred & Shelley's Bees New Member

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    DonMcJr, we vacumed a swarm out of my aunts chimney so no queen cage, just our own inexperience and not pushing the frames close enough together. We have black plastic frames with the plastic sheets that are waxed and stamped? Does that make them plasticell?

    Ok I think we'll just remove all the wacky comb and let them start over on that bit. The rest of the frames are looking good.

    Perri, I will say hi to Don for sure. Ahh, I think this bee thing is kind of turning out like when your kids want a dog......but then you end up feeding and walking it? Kidding. It's actually been really fun to do it together. Unfortunately we don't really have a good place in the back yard at the moment so the roof seemed like a good idea for the time being.