Dead Hive Salvaging remove honey or not

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Michbeeman63, Mar 14, 2012.

  1. Michbeeman63

    Michbeeman63 New Member

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    I am thinking about taking my hive frames from my dead out and extracting the honey. my 2 posts post mortum show pics of the hive. many have helped me diagnose and it seems there was some dysentary. I don't want to propagate this problem and plan to extract the honey from the top super, about 7 frames before I heat the hive to 59C for 24 hours to kill any spores.

    any thoughts on the honey? can it be eaten? sure looks clean, but looks can be deceiving. Would you go my route, or just freeze the frames as is and not extract the honey. Heard some horror stories of not extracting the honey, and it turning to sugar.

    thanks for the help.
     
  2. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    if I had other hives and they needed feed I would use it in that manner.

    cold honey is extremely difficult to extract (typically requires days of warming up to get it out).

    I myself (and based on evidence shown) don't think there was anything wrong with the honey in this dead hive.
     

  3. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    If you're concerned about cleanliness, you said it looks clean. If you're concerned about picking up any germs from the honey (assuming that they may have had a case of bacterially caused dyssentary), fear not. The germs that affect bees don't affect humans.
    Enjoy the honey (if you don't need it for feeding).
    Allow me to correct your expression regarding the honey "turning to sugar". Too many people who know nothing about bees see crystallized honey and call it sugar. They'll say that the beek used sugar to feed his bees and the "honey" turned to sugar.
    Honey is Honey--it can crystallize, but it is still honey. Warming it (not in the comb) will return it to its liquid form. Bees will feed on crystallized honey, but only as a "third choice". First comes nectar, second comes honey and third comes crystallized honey.
     
  4. BoilerJim

    BoilerJim New Member

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    I just extracted about 8 frames of honey that came from a hive that died over the winter. The honey is clean, clear, smells good, and tastes great. Enjoy the fruits of your bees. :smile: