Dead Hive - what do you do?

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Bryan Brassell, Jun 22, 2017.

  1. Bryan Brassell

    Bryan Brassell New Member

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    Found queenless, eggless hive overrun with hive beetle larvae (hundreds) and was moths. Hive had two supers full of honey. I tossed the bees that were left and put all the frames in a deep freezer to kill off the pests. Now I have two supers of frozen honey - any suggestions on what to do with it?
     
  2. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Member

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    start over..I lost a hive to mites, so the next year I bought a new nuc and started over, then I treated for mites and the hive made it through winter in good numbers, then I believe it swarmed and im still working on the hive now, ill open it back up in a week to see if there is continued new brood, either they requeened themselves, as I tried to split the hive and put 2 new queens a friend had...but either way put a hive back together with a new nuc or package of bees..
     

  3. Bryan Brassell

    Bryan Brassell New Member

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    Oh, we will start another hive with the equipment - we have ten more active hives. What I am really wondering is what to do with the frozen honey. It was suggested to me to thaw it one frame at a time and put it in an empty box on top of a healthy hive - the theory being they would clean it out of the dead hive beetle larvae, and either use or move and store the honey.
     
  4. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Member

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    what killed the bees from that hive, you could spread a problem by puting that honey in other hives..
     
  5. Jay Jermo

    Jay Jermo New Member

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    I agree with Roadkill. If you are cost sensitive, (and if you have not considered this already), put the word out that you will collect swarms. Every swarm you catch will save you several hundred dollars in bees (as opposed to buying a whole new package). Talk to local produce farmers - they will be your best friends. They have the most land to watch out for and are therefore likely to see more swarms than the average Joe. Also, notify the local exterminator and see if you can incentivize them to make you aware when homeowners call them to remove bees. All it will probably take is for you to donate the occasional jar of honey.

    Also, if you have not yet seen this, here is an article on swarm baiting:
    http://www.dave-cushman.net/bee/baithives.html

    Jay
    www.heyhoney.biz
     
  6. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Member

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    I think earlier this year my hive swarmed, and they requeened themselves. I have another thread that covered that, but now I put up a baited swarm hive I will keep up, so if they do it again( they ran off before I could split or add a super to them)hopefully they will find my swarm hive and I can keep them from running off...that was a good article on bait hives JJ, thanxs for that..
     
  7. ccjersey

    ccjersey Member

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    If the honey is putrid, the bees don't want it either.

    I just went through this. I pulled off my honey supers last month, extracted the honey and put them back on after a few days. Tried to get it done before the hive beetles and wax moths got to the stacked supers. After a few weeks, I checked my hives and discovered the beetles had exploded in several of them all in one bee yard. I guess I missed some swarms etc and just had too much "real estate" for the weak ones to cover and there seems to be more beetle pressure in that yard.

    Anyway, my solution was to take the garden hose to all the frames that had "YUCK " I washed out everything I could with the spray and even scraped out some really bad patches. Finally I shook out all the water i could and set the supers on top of my strong colonies. I read later I should have frozen them first, but I didn't.

    I am a month in now and the weak hives that got into trouble are all full of hive beetles, but no maggots......yet. Planning to use CheckMite + as soon as it arrives. Have done no other hive beetle control other than smashing a few with hive tool! Even the strong hives in that yard have too many beetles. The strong hives in another yard are doing great, normal numbers of hive beetles in jail under top cover. Except I had a formerly strong hive that swarmed about a month ago and 2 weeks ago, I reduced them down a lot, pulling the washed out supers off and adding them to neighboring hives. At that time everything looked good, no excessive beetles or maggots, new (virgin?) queen in the hive, but too few bees. I gave them a frame of capped brood to help out. Today I found that there were lots of free ranging hive beetles and some maggots in the combs with the new queen only laying a small patch of brood on one frame, so I took out all 7 contaminated frames and replaced with some clean drawn comb and new foundation for the rest. Hope that will take off some of the pressure and let them get going.

    The strong hives that stayed strong have cleaned up the yucky frames and are doing great! Plan is to wash out the 7 frames I took out today, FREEZE them and then place them on top of a colony that is strong to get them cleaned up. If they are plastic foundation, I will probably just scrape away all the damage. Think they are wax though.

    I also installed some home made Swifter pad traps today to try on the one yard that had less beetles. Will use the Checkmite in the hives in the other one as well as traps, neverwet coated shims GuardStar the soil etc. May need to just move that group. Things are fixing to get really bad there! Hope I can make it bad for the beetles!
     
  8. ccjersey

    ccjersey Member

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    If the honey is putrid, the bees don't want it either.

    I just went through this. I pulled off my honey supers last month, extracted the honey and put them back on after a few days. Tried to get it done before the hive beetles and wax moths got to the stacked supers. After a few weeks, I checked my hives and discovered the beetles had exploded in several of them all in one bee yard. I guess I missed some swarms etc and just had too much "real estate" for the weak ones to cover and there seems to be more beetle pressure in that yard.

    Anyway, my solution was to take the garden hose to all the frames that had "YUCK " I washed out everything I could with the spray and even scraped out some really bad patches. Finally I shook out all the water i could and set the supers on top of my strong colonies. I read later I should have frozen them first, but I didn't.

    I am a month in now and the weak hives that got into trouble are all full of hive beetles, but no maggots......yet. Planning to use CheckMite + as soon as it arrives. Have done no other hive beetle control other than smashing a few with hive tool! Even the strong hives in that yard have too many beetles. The strong hives in another yard are doing great, normal numbers of hive beetles in jail under top cover. Except I had a formerly strong hive that swarmed about a month ago and 2 weeks ago, I reduced them down a lot, pulling the washed out supers off and adding them to neighboring hives. At that time everything looked good, no excessive beetles or maggots, new (virgin?) queen in the hive, but too few bees. I gave them a frame of capped brood to help out. Today I found that there were lots of free ranging hive beetles and some maggots in the combs with the new queen only laying a small patch of brood on one frame, so I took out all 7 contaminated frames and replaced with some clean drawn comb and new foundation for the rest. Hope that will take off some of the pressure and let them get going.

    The strong hives that stayed strong have cleaned up the yucky frames and are doing great! Plan is to wash out the 7 frames I took out today, FREEZE them and then place them on top of a colony that is strong to get them cleaned up. If they are plastic foundation, I will probably just scrape away all the damage. Think they are wax though.

    I also installed some home made Swifter pad traps today to try on the one yard that had less beetles. Will use the Checkmite in the hives in the other one as well as traps, neverwet coated shims GuardStar the soil etc. May need to just move that group. Things are fixing to get really bad there! Hope I can make it bad for the beetles!
     
  9. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Member

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    I believe the hive beetles live or breed in the soil below the hive, so if you can block off or treat the soil, that will help cut down on what wants to crawl into the hive..but at the same time you dont want to poison the bees..