Dead pupae -- Normal?

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by ablanton, May 7, 2012.

  1. ablanton

    ablanton New Member

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    This morning I noticed several dead pupae being carried out of the hive. It's the first time I've seen this. Is it normal for a few to die here & there, or should I be concerned?
     
  2. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    A few dead pupae is not a great concern, dozens and dozens is something else, might be nothing, or the beginning of something else just for the moment watch that hive and see if the problem stops there, or accelerates.
    Barry
     

  3. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    I've got dozens and dozens. I assumed it was from the cold snap, but what else should I check?
     
  4. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    If you had chilled brood then it will resolve itself, as the discarding of dead brood indicates. check the hive out in another week--should see capped brood again. If on the other hand the problem persists, or gets worse you will have to carefully inspect the colony looking for disease. Adequate stores would not be a issue in this case as the brood had already stopped requiring feed at that point ( thinking out loud sorry )
    Barry
     
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    any number of 'causes' can be added to cold spell. hygienic bees, starvation are certain one and two on my list of possibilities.
     
  6. ablanton

    ablanton New Member

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    Hmmm... We just went through a week of 90 degree days and 60 degree nights, so I don't think they got cold. There is plenty of honey in there... I'll keep watching. Thanks for the info, everybody.
     
  7. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    Did you recently treat the bees for mites or for anything else?
    Have you been feeding the bees- if so, what are you feeding and how did you prepare it?
    Do you know if any local farmers have recently done extensive spraying in your neighborhood?
     
  8. ablanton

    ablanton New Member

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    It's a new hive, package installed 3/31. I haven't treated for anything. Been feeding 1:1 syrup, prepared with regular sugar & city tap water. I'm in a suburban area, no "farms" within 4 or 5 miles. I guess a neighbor could have put something out, but I'd expect to see dead workers...
     
  9. Redcrane

    Redcrane New Member

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    Had the same with one of my hives. State inspector took a look & thought it was caused by Carolina Jasimine. Haven't had a chance to recheck as the wife has been in ICU for 17 days today. Right now I'm living in our travel trailer 60 mi. from home.
     
  10. ablanton

    ablanton New Member

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    So Jasmine is not good for bees? Glad you told me. It was smelling so good at the store yesterday, I seriously considered buying some. Glad I didn't.
     
  11. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    Are you perhaps boiling the sugar syrup after you added the sugar to the water? Just checking... If it s just a handful of larvae for one or two days I wouldn't worry about it.
     
  12. ablanton

    ablanton New Member

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    No. I bring my water to a boil, but I take it off the heat and let the boiling stop before I actually add the sugar. Then I stir it for 4 or 5 minutes until completely dissolved.

    I watched a while when I got home this evening. Didn't see any more being brought out. Everything looked normal and everybody seemed busy coming & going.
     
  13. ablanton

    ablanton New Member

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    Well, another scare this evening. Walked down to check out the hive and found what looked like close to 100 dead bees littering the ground in front of the hive. I did not notice them this morning when I visited. The package has been doing well and I have a lot more bees, so I would expect to see more dead ones as they get old and die off; however, I was surprised to see so many appear suddenly. Watching the hive, there still seems to be a lot of normal "coming & going" activity. This may be completely normal and I may be concerned about nothing. But, being new at this, I am not sure. I guess it's possible they could have gotten into some poison at a neighbor's house. Any other ideas?

    http://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1NvUf2UpPSfaH_3V4qgFdw/videos
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2012
  14. ablanton

    ablanton New Member

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    Apologies for the side-ways video. Guess I wasn't holding the phone the right way! :eek:
     
  15. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    When relatively large numbers of dead bees are in front of the hive the situation turns on a red light warning for possible poisoning. These days it's not only farmers with big fields who spray toxic substances---it could be a neighbor within flying distance who had sprayed something flowering and your bees are getting it unintentionally.
     
  16. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    very definitely what efmesch said + it has been reported by another Texas beekeeper (and a new member here) that screen bottom boards + rain can lead to some death of immature forms of bees (I would guess created by the splash at the bottom edges of the frames in the brood nest???).
     
  17. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    Just a thought because of what's been in the news lately- are farmers planting corn seed near you right now?
     
  18. ablanton

    ablanton New Member

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    I'm not aware of any major corn farms within 4 or 5 miles, but I guess it's possible. The only large farm that I know of within "flying distance" is a dairy farm.


    The ants cleaned up all of the dead bees from yesterday. No new ones appeared today. The hive has been humming with activity all day -- even during periods of light rain. All looks to be well for now. Maybe a few just got into some neighbor's sevin yesterday.
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2012
  19. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    Ignorant question: What is wrong with doing this?
     
  20. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    Hobie- there is an ongoing debate about whether boiling your sugar syrup (after adding the sugar to the water) creates a substance that is bad for the bees. I think if you don't stir it the bottom syrup can easily burn and and that can be bad. To avoid that possibility altogether, you can simply boil the water, turn off the heat, and add the sugar- no problem dissolving then. I'm just trying to think ALL possibilities that might be overlooked in Ablanton's scenario here.