Dealing with black locust

Discussion in 'General Gardening' started by BjornBee, Mar 16, 2010.

  1. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

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    I have a number of black locust saplings in the yard. A couple were a good two or three inches round in the yard.

    And one has been restarting in the garden (raised bed) for two years now. It was a good 5 year old tree a few years ago when I cut it down. I have dug down a couple feet, but the tap root never ended. And it seemingly never ends in sending up suckers in the area.

    I know there are chemicals and stuff at the hardware store. but this is also in the middle of the garden. I would just mow it off, but that is not possible.

    So what else can one do? Any tricks, home remedies, or a way to kill these off?

    Seems black locust is as hardy as they come. Very hard to get rid of.

    Thank you.
     
  2. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Bjorn, I use Thordon(sp?) You cut the tree or bush and paint the stump around the fresh cut bark. You can buy the RTU type, i get mine at the MFA feed store. I've never had a tree or bush grow back after using it. Jack
     

  3. srvfantexasflood

    srvfantexasflood New Member

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    I share your pain, Bjorn. It's nature's way of ensuring plant survival. The juglone eliminates competition by other plants. My property borders city property. There are mature black walnut trees all along that property line. There are also all the squirrels that live in and off the black walnuts. Darned tree rats!

    I would have the kids, if they are old enough, pull out walnut sprouts as they come up and pick up any walnuts as they fall.
    Here is a partial list of juglone tolerant plants. http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/cro ... xicity.htm Here is another one. http://www.plantpath.wisc.edu/pddc/fact ... Walnut.pdf
    You might try raised beds for the more shallow rooted vegetables. It might be worth the effort to lay landscaping cloth down at the bottom of the raised beds. I have done this for my herbs and have had good luck.
    Last year I grew tomatoes in straw bales with alot of success. My mother has done this for several years. In our area, JetStars seem to do the best for this.
    Here is a web site describing straw bale gardening. http://www.carolinacountry.com/cgardens ... straw.html
    I also know from experience, if you plant outside the drip line of the original canopy, you might be ok.
    Juglone can also be leached into the soil from the walnuts laying on the ground and from rain runoff from the tree canopy when leafed out.

    I almost forgot, you can contact your county extension office for more suggestions. They are eager to help.
     
  4. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    I had a black locust tree in my yard that was rotten and dangerous, so I had it taken down. Then I went on vacation. When I returned, there were about 200 foot-high black locust saplings growing all over the yard. When I dug down, they were all sprouting from roots of the old tree.

    I pulled. I cut. I dug. All to no avail. I finally chose one sapling that was in a reasonable location, and said, "Okay, you can live."

    I cut the rest off as low as possible, and they never came back.

    The will to live is not limited to humans!
     
  5. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    While black Locust ( a legume interestingly enough ), can be a pain literally and figuratively they are excellant nectar sources and generate wonderfully light honey and make great border fence posts what person or animal would want to fight through those nasty thorns my cattle didn't want any part of them even to scratch with.
    Barry
     
  6. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Barry, your right. The black locust tree does produce a very good light honey if the weather is right. I had 11 big 50 to 60 yr. old black locust trees in my back yard (storm took out all but two last year) and on an average i would get one good year of honey out of five off of them. There were years the blooms were hanging all over them and the air was filled with their sweet smell, and the only thing working them was bumble bees, wasp and some kind of very small bees, but a honey bee not to be found.In my area they are in full bloom on May 10th. Strange little bugs they are :confused: . Jack
     
  7. srvfantexasflood

    srvfantexasflood New Member

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    Oh wow! I just reread your post Bjorn! Black locust, not black walnut! DUH!
    Black locust makes good honey, but it is only in bloom about 10 days and those ten days are usually crummy weather around here.

    When ever I envision Christ on the cross with a crown of thorns, I always think of black locust thorns.
     
  8. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    To warn anyone who is tempted to plant a stand of black locust: We have a swampy ravine full of them. We are also tormented by these tiny flies for about 2 weeks in April, that dig in your hair and draw blood when they bite. You can't even walk outside without them getting in your hair and eyes and coming back in with at least 10 itchy welts. They are not gnats, they are not black flies... I have never seen the likes of them. Someone told me they are symbiotic with the locust trees.
     
  9. srvfantexasflood

    srvfantexasflood New Member

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    Bjorn- Here is a link to Tordon RTU. You can read the label. http://www.beyondpesticides.org/dow/ind ... els/tordon rtu.pdf
    I believe this is the product brooksbeefarm was referring to.
    I just heard a landscaper praising this stuff. I plan to get some to kill off the poison ivy around here.