Death angel drives the mosquito truck

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by ibeelearning, Feb 24, 2013.

  1. ibeelearning

    ibeelearning Member

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    For those of us having to contemplate the contributing, multiple factors to dead and vacated hives...

    I saw my first mosquito of the season and idly thought, "Well I guess the city will be around with the mosquito sprayer truck soon." Then I realized it might as well be a bee sprayer truck... the neighbors and their Roundup could be the least of my problems.

    One more thing to add to the list.
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    When I lived in Ms. in 1982-84, my bees were in my yard about 75 feet from the road. They sprayed for mosquitoes regularly. I never saw a problem with the bees.
     

  3. lazy shooter

    lazy shooter New Member

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    Is Roundup toxic to bees?
     
  4. ablanton

    ablanton New Member

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    Several homes in my neighborhood used Mosquito Squad last year, but it didn't seem to bother my bees. My next-door neighbor asked them about the procedure and explained it to me before letting them do it. She didn't want to hurt my bees. They only spray the tree trunks. I didn't have any problems.

    That said, I don't know how municipalities spray. They may do it differently.
     
  5. Hawk

    Hawk New Member

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    I'm in Dallas (Richardson), Tx - and last year they flew multiple sorties - spraying pyrethroid neurotoxins in an attempt to perform an adulticide on the mosquitoes.

    It has proven ineffectve, as the cases of West Nile declined in Dallas county after the spraying at the EXACT same rate as the decline in counties that DID NOT spray. So - ineffective as an adulticide.

    The best situation (to us) would be education to council members & "powers that be that spend our tax money" and to neighborhood residents that larvacide is a much more effective means of mosquito larvae elimination - by eliminating standing water, and not offering a place for the eggs to be laid in the first place.

    Interesting information here: http://www.dallasobserver.com/2013-02-21/news/cdc-offers-weak-numbers-on-west-nile-spraying/
     
  6. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Hawk,

    Did you notice WHERE the West Nile started. Out here in the sticks where we let our grass die during the drought, no cases. Park Cities, Trophy Club, places with sprinkler systems and lawn services, tons of West Nile. The water that needs treated is the standing runoff in the storm drains. Haven't figured out how to tell Fort Worth city council that.

    Gypsi
     
  7. Hawk

    Hawk New Member

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    Lake highlands, White Rock Lake, and the green belt areas (standing bodies of water/ponds)... Yes - plus the more affluent neighborhoods that had ignored the watering restrictions over the summer and kept their lawns green.