Defensive shimmer or wave

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by barry42001, Jun 14, 2012.

  1. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    Few monthes back, when the county Bee Inspector came over to check the girls, he opened the hives up with me, and was rather quick about removing the inner cover. As he did that the bees ( Buckfasts ??? ) developed a shimmer or wave that encompassed the entire brood nest. I haven't seen that behavior again in any of the three buckfast colonies I have.
    I have only seen a similiar behavior demonstrated by Asiatic and some South American Bees, but never seen in in European bees. Now wasps and hornets and yellow jackets will get a bit of a shimmer or shake but I know what that means-lol someone is just about to have a bad day--:chased:eek:r several ones. I haven't seen this behavior as stated, in European bees,Is this a genetic trait left over from the asiatic bees that Brother Adams inter-bred with to produce the buckfast bees?
    Barry
     
  2. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    sounds interesting.... but no I have never heard nor read of this behavior.
     

  3. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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  4. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    There was a documentary on Animals of the Indian continent, The Indian giant honeybee was of course one of the subjects that were talked about. As the camera crew got close to the single large comb that they build, and they were trying to elicit the behavior, but as one all the bees shimmered in unison created the illusion of one large creature, instead of many smaller ones. Bearing in mind that the Indian Giant Honeybee, workers are over 1 inch long would think that would be all the convincing one would need.
    Barry
     
  5. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    A bee over 1 inch long? :shock: That would probably be enough for me to call it a day! :lol:
     
  6. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    Perry, not one---several thousands, with attitude.:beg::hunter:
     
  7. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

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    Buckfast does not and never did contain Asiatic stock --
    "The Buckfast bee from Buckfast Abbey contains heritage from mainly A.m. ligurica (North Italian), A.m. mellifera (English), A.m. mellifera (French), A.m. anatolica (Turkish) and A.m. cecropia (Greek). The Buckfast bee of today also contain heritage from two African rare African stocks A.m. sahariensis and the A.m. monticola, but not A.m. Scutellata."
    Washboarding occurs with numerous European honey bees.
     
  8. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    I have never seen this behavior before, and not since couldn't understand where it came from, again thanks Gary.
    Barry
     
  9. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

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    That is the great thing about bees - There is a new adventure every day. I have been in beekeeping since 1969. I have been to every Florida Bee College since it started, and I am part of the Florida Apiary Inspection team. I have taught beekeeping overseas. I still learn something new every day.