Demon posessed killer bees

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by james007, Jun 28, 2015.

  1. james007

    james007 New Member

    Messages:
    40
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Help! I have five hives and with a few exceptions things have gone pretty well for my first year. Most of my colonies are very gentle, two are not. One of the more defensive colonies is still something I can live with. One, however, I believe would put Africanized bees to shame. They are soooo aggressive (How aggressive are they?) if I get within 20 feet of the hive, I better be covered from head to toe or be able to run 40 mph! I'm a very new bee botcher but I have enough hives to compare with and these are definitely overly aggressive, even to the point that I was 80 yards from the hive this afternoon and one of them found me, attacked me, and stung me in the eye ("I will look for you, I will find you, and I will kill you!"). I think they're hunting me for sport. This hive lost a queen earlier in the year so I added a frame of brood and eggs from my most gentle hive, thinking that might fix the problem. I think the dang things are meaner now than before. My wife is extremely allergic and says they've got to go. I was hoping that someone might have some good advice or need a colony of demon possessed killer bees. Thanks much.
     
  2. ibeelearning

    ibeelearning Member

    Messages:
    316
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Pinch the Q and replace with a mated Q, ready to lay... completely new gene set. Sorry, can't help you with the wife.
    Sallie @ Bee Hive Barn should still have mated Qs to ship. If not, I may have an extra.
     

  3. camero7

    camero7 Member

    Messages:
    715
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    18
    They could well be queenless... I've had hives that met me at the truck door and often found them to be queenless. A new queen will solve the problem no matter what the issue is. Just make sure there is no queen in the hive when you try to introduce a new queen. And put some tape over the candy end of the queen cage for a few days so that the new queen has plenty of time to spread her pheromones in the hive.
     
  4. james007

    james007 New Member

    Messages:
    40
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    This time I saw the queen but I think you are right. I need completely new genetics. I hope I can find her again. Thanks!
     
  5. ibeelearning

    ibeelearning Member

    Messages:
    316
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Camero7's theory makes sense. You are probably in a dearth over there, so they would have no fresh eggs or larva from which to make a Q even if they wanted to supersede. But even so, if I am going to do battle with pissed off crazy bees, I'd rather introduce new genes.

    If you re-queen now for whatever whether queenless or for genetics, feed, feed, feed with some manner of internal feeder to simulate a flow, else she won't lay. Give 'em some babies to fawn over. [btw, this works with church fights, too]

    Hot hives are just exhausting to deal with. I've got a one with which I need to take my own advice with my last spare queen... but, just thinking about going all the way down through it looking for the old queen... I'd rather go to Steve Martin's sadistic dentist.

    Glad your other colonies are doing well. You had me worried for a while.
     
  6. Ray

    Ray Member

    Messages:
    582
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Stop by the local pharmacy and buy a jar of sulfur. Suit up, get your smoker red hot. Kill the whole bunch! Life is too short to work bees like that!
     
  7. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    2,743
    Likes Received:
    9
    Trophy Points:
    38
    I just tore into a hive I was pretty sure was africanized when I went to feed them on Friday. I opened the hive yesterday and normal bees. Seems the old queen was making her departure on Friday and I arrived to feed at the wrong moment. Glad I didn't use the CO2 canister I bought. They are a little hot, had 4 queen cells, one looks like a queen hatched and I had had a queen excluder over the bottom board to keep their drones confined. I killed a lot of drones yesterday, then did drone brood. And in about 200 drone larva I found one, and only one, varroa mite. Yes, the queen's dna can stay if the new one gets mated, and any drones I missed, at this point, can mate with my queens.

    Sulfur lacks intelligence to discriminate. A good suit and a good veil and a smoker go a long way. And Camero is right, a dearth makes them hotter. Feed
     
  8. james007

    james007 New Member

    Messages:
    40
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I think the queen idea and a really tight bee suit may work. I hope im right. One more event like yesterday and the sulfur is coming out. Dangit they are mean. Thats the second time this colony has found their way into my veil. I saw the queen yesterday and was very gentle but later wished I had squashed her. Next time I will with a smile on my face. Thanks very much for the good advice. I didnt know about sulfur but may use it yet.
     
  9. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

    Messages:
    728
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    You may get sulphur powder from a garden supplier. It is used as a dust to prevent rot in some stored flower tubers.

    You may get a funny look if you ask for sulphur in a pharmacy. It is one of the ingredients in gunpowder.
     
  10. james007

    james007 New Member

    Messages:
    40
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Now that you mention it I think I remember seeing sulfur in the garden center. I may have to try it but i hope I dont have to. Thanks much.
     
  11. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    2,743
    Likes Received:
    9
    Trophy Points:
    38
    I keep a sock full of sulfur on my front porch, in a jar so it stays dry. Dust on socks and inner/outer pantlegs to prevent chiggers from climbing and biting.