Did I do OK or ????

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by farmgirl47, Jan 19, 2013.

  1. farmgirl47

    farmgirl47 New Member

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    I should ask before acting, but sometimes you have to make decisions on the fly (sounds good). I went out to the hives today a nice sunny 62. One hive was a deadout--have no idea why, plenty of food, but hive beatles was a problem last fall. I really believed I had it under control. Not one dead bee in the hive?????

    But, the other hive was full of bees, boiling over with bees. My intention was to check stores and feed sugar brick if necessary, however I took the deep with the frames full of honey from the dead hive and set it on top of the second deep of this hive thinking that the honey would be better than a sugar brick. So now I have three deeps on this hive is that OK?

    Then, I left the other frames out in the open for the bees to clean up. There was some honey--- but not a lot. I will go out later and put the empty hive back together and can I just leave it next to the healthy hive where it is, or do I need to preserve the frames properly. I have mouse guards on both hives. What should I have done and what do I do now? Thanks for any help.
     
  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Unless there was some obvious reason for the dead out, putting the third deep on the good hive shouldn't pose a problem, I over winter some hives that way. Perhaps the bees absconded in the fall due to the SHB?
    I would not leave the hive open as it may attract unwanted guests. The dead hive should be made bee tight but allowed to ventilate, or if you have the freezer space, pop the frames in a bag and store them in a freezer.
     

  3. farmgirl47

    farmgirl47 New Member

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    Thanks, PerryBee for your quick reply. I will retrive those frames and place them in the freezer. I have been waiting for a chance to check on the girls.. The weather is supposed to turn cold tomorrow, and winter will be back.
     
  4. Bees In Miami

    Bees In Miami New Member

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    I am with PerryBee...Store them in the freezer. The SHB will take over those frames in no time, making them worthless. I'd be concerned about wax moths getting in there, too. Sorry to hear about the dead out. :sad:
     
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    thinking on the run is (imho) an essential quality of any good beekeeper. I first would suggest you hone and continue to use that talent. at this time of year what you did was absolutely appropriate <I am by extension suggest here at other times of the year such action would NOT be entirely appropriate.

    are you still having freezing weather in Kansas?

    if yes then then the shb problems should be well under control. if during the warmer months you are still experiencing serious small hive beetle problems then 1) placing a hive in the full sunshine 2) knocking back vegetation around the hive and 3) freezing any comb that you even THINK may be contaminated are all good things to put on the to do list. when the small hive beetle arrived here I found #3 was essential if I didn't want a frame to be totally destroyed.... often times when I discovered a frame that did need to go into the freezer I would feed that unit just a bit (a quart or so) to just get it headed in the proper direction. And lastly any debris on the bottom board of a small hive beetle infested hive should be burned and NOT simply dumped on the ground.

    PS... you did EXCELLENT!
     
  6. farmgirl47

    farmgirl47 New Member

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    Hi, thanks everyone. Although Saturday was sunny and 62, it was 13 this morning and did not get above freezing today, or yesterday for that matter. My husband thinks we should do a ground treatment for the hive beatles. I also could be more conscious about keeping the hive area free of hive/bee debris. My attitude was it's outside--but I will keep the bee/hive debris contained---lesson learned. I really did not think/know of contraindications of my actions.
    The hives are placed in full sun until late afternoon- thats the best I can do. Late summer my husband fixed a hive stand that allowed me to place the legs in cans of oil, I read somewhere that helps.
    I am looking forward to my second year. Thanks again for helping me, I have learned a lot from this forum.
     
  7. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    you should be able to ask around or search prior threads about what folks are doing for ground treatment. I am unsure if the stuff you buy is expensive or not since I myself tend to avoid such TEMPORARY remedies. I seem to recall someone using wood ash although I suspect anything that would burn back the vegetation or dramatically alter the soil ph would work just fine. Perhaps one or two others will toss in their own home grown ideas here of ground treatments for the small hive beetle.