Did my first inspection today and I have concerns

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by rw02kr43, Jun 23, 2012.

  1. rw02kr43

    rw02kr43 New Member

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    First off, neither my wife or I got stung. So that was good. We got our nuc last Saturday and waiting until today to open up the hive and look around. Man those frames with caps and honey are heavy. We had about 6 frames that had been touched. But, We never did find the queen. We also found a cell that looked bad. I took off that one and took pics of it. Our queen should have a green dot on her. Is it possible our hygenic bees cleaned off the green dot?
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    Jason
     
  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Hey Jason:
    First, congrats on no stings. :thumbsup:
    Deep frames filled with honey can weigh up to 7 lbs. so yup, they can get heavy.
    Where on the frame did you find that cell? Not sure what it looked like prior to you removing it. What I can see is what looks like an old queen cup with an egg standing up in front of it. I am not sure if the rest of it may have been a queen cell or not it is so misshapen.
    "Our queen should have a green dot on her".
    Are you sure the queen was marked in the first place? (Did you actually see her with the mark). I have paid for marked queens and received unmarked ones before. With your hygenic bees I guess it is possible they could have cleaned off the green mark. You have eggs in there (for sure, nice pic of one) so she was there in the last 3 days!
    Keep us up to date.
     

  3. rw02kr43

    rw02kr43 New Member

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    The cell was in the upper quarter of the frame and in the middle. You can see it in the 2nd to last pic. The top of the frame is to the right if the photo. We did see the mark on the queen when we released her from the cage. She had a bright green dot on her. I thought about going back out and looking again, but since I was just out there I think maybe I should just leave them alone. The smooshed picture with the egg is it is the cell that we thought might be a swarm cell.

    here are all the pictures of the frames
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    Jason
     
  4. rw02kr43

    rw02kr43 New Member

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  5. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    From your description of where the cell was located, it tells me it is not a swarm cell. Swarm cells are usually located along the bottom of a frame and supercedure or emergency queen cells are built on the face of the comb. Swarm cells are often built in large numbers 6 to 20 (I have a pic with 17 on one frame). Supercedure/emergency cells are never in that number, anywherer from 1 to 4 or 5.
    I would not be too concerned, you have proof that your queen was there (at least within the last 3 days) and you probably just missed seeing her. Your hive still has plenty of room so relax and enjoy (all the while keeping an eye on them) :wink:
     
  6. rw02kr43

    rw02kr43 New Member

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    What do you mean when you say the face of the comb? You can see the one we took off here, it's in the upper right center of the picture.
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  7. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    That would be the face or side of the comb. Bees build supercedure/emergancy cells here because that is where eggs are when they have to build them. Swarm cells are along the bottom of frames and queens lay eggs in them (queen cups).
    I don't see anything in the pictures that would alarm me. It looks like a good group of bees.
     
  8. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    What you have circled is a queen cell, is this what you removed that had the egg in it?

    If so it is a supercedure cell or emergency cell, for some reason they are replacing the queen. What you have to figure out is why or what happened to the old queen. From the looks of things she was laying a good solid pattern, and as Perry said she was there at least 3 days ago to lay an egg. If you can not find the queen that could mean (of course she could be hiding and running from you) something happened to her and you are queenless, the reason for the new queen cell. She could still be in the hive and they cleaned the paint off of her (reason for not finding her) but for some reason they are replacing her (hurt, just not doing something right, pheromones not strong, etc.), so for the time you are not queenless.

    There are a bunch of things to look at, but would give them a week and go back in and look for eggs, that is a tell tale sign of the queen being there. When I look for the queen, the frame with the most freshest eggs on it will usually be where she is at, not always but one of the better places to look the hardest. I look for the long abdomen more than anything, it just stands out to my eye.
     
  9. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    the circled space looks to be a supercedure cell one lone in middle of the frame, and looks fairly mature like within a day or two of capping.Again I refer back to my thread--why would they do that to a young robust queen laying a excellant brood pattern???
    Barry
     
  10. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    OK, now I'm confused :lol:
    Was that egg actually inside that cell in the pic where you are holding it between your finger and thumb? I see no sign that that wax in your hand had anything other than an egg in it.
    If it was a mature queen cell, that wouldn't be an egg, it would be a pupae. If you removed that cell, was there a pupae inside it? If not, it was a dud and they are not replacing your queen (yet).
     
  11. rw02kr43

    rw02kr43 New Member

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    That thing I'm holding is the cell that is on the jar lid. It had a nice looking egg inside. That was all that was inside of that cell. Just the egg. So would the queen lay an egg to replace herself? Bees are complicated. I just went out and sat next to the hive for a bit. They sure are busy.

    Jason
     
  12. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    If that wax on the jar lid is the same cell as in the red circle then you need not worry. That may have been a queen "cup" something bees build to have around just in case. The cell in the circle looks like it may appear to have been a capped queen cell (hard to tell in the picture) but if all there was in it was an egg it was not.
    I would take G3's advice and check it again in a few days, look for eggs and you may even find the queen herself.
    Ain't beekeeping wonderful? By the way, we will never know it all, they prove that to us every day! :mrgreen:
     
  13. CeeGee

    CeeGee New Member

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    May be wrong about this, but the second picture in your first post, a little right of center-frame, seems to appear to have an attendant circle, but I cant get my computer to zoom, so could be a popular waggle party....
     
  14. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    jason asked:
    "So would the queen lay an egg to replace herself?" (yes she would), and said: "Bees are complicated."

    :lol:, welcome to beekeeping jason. here is a helpful link to identify queen cells:

    queen cell identification