Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,126 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
No Trade-Off between Learning Speed and Associative Flexibility in Bumblebees: A Reversal Learning Test with Multiple Colonies
Differences in learning performance and cognitive (behavioral) flexibility could reflect more general differences in colony learning ability.
Or to “dumb it down†– If your bees died the last three winters, you might want to learn from the bees and do something different.
http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0045096
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,522 Posts
Who are we teaching, the bees, or the beeks?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,126 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
When you figure that out you will be a happier beekeeper. Von Frisch, Wenner, Tom Seeley and others learn from the bees.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,522 Posts
I'm already a lot happier than I was last year. When they want me to add a house to the neighborhood, they send a swarm to the swarm trap and tell me to start construction! Works, I can take a hint. They also send a messenger to the front porch when the feed jar runs low.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
967 Posts
I am going to see if I can get some videos for the girls to watch on the long winter evenings ahead.

I think the significance of looking at hereditary learning capability would be in selecting probable assets for selective breeding programs. There are so many different traits that may be of importance I shiver at the thought of culling genetics by such brute force methods as using varroa survivability only to select survivors for the future that may hold in store many other different challenges. I am no fan of the Bond Method of selection. It is no doubt effective but extremely short term focused, in my opinion.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,522 Posts
I don't know whether videos would do them much good, but the group mind definitely remembers what we as beekeepers do for a couple of days. And they do learn not to go down the waterfall and drown

(and it can't be because the workers don't survive to reproduce, because they can't reproduce anyway) So any bees that survive around here are fairly adaptable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,487 Posts
unlearning is awfully difficult. or perhaps put another way... once learning become hardwired how do you unhardwire it?

as I have come to expect.... just another great link from Americasbeekeeper.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,829 Posts
tecumseh;166549[COLOR=#0000ff said:
]unlearning is awfully difficult. or perhaps put another way... once learning become hardwired how do you unhardwire it[/COLOR]?

as I have come to expect.... just another great link from Americasbeekeeper.
When I was hired as a transit operator years ago, they were looking for guys with the correct license'. Shortly after that they started hiring an extraordinary number of women as drivers. Their reasoning was it was easier to train someone with no preconceived ideas or bad habits to break, a blank canvas if you will. 20 years later they still do the same thing so I guess they were right.

As for the latter, couldn't agree more! :thumbsup:
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,522 Posts
Actually Perry and Tec, you're right. I train my own crews because I don't have to argue with them and un-train them in my field. I know how I want it done and what biologically and chemically will work, and most people would be trained in neither. But after 5 years, both of my guys can quote me without realizing they are doing it.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top