Different method of hiving a package ???

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by n5odj, Mar 29, 2010.

  1. n5odj

    n5odj New Member

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    Howdy. I’m gonna install three packages this spring. Before, I’ve always done it “traditionally†by dumping them into the top of the hive (of course, with the queen cage properly placed into the hive).

    If I put the queen cage into the hive, make a fairly small opening in the bee shipping crate, & put the shipping crate up next to the hive entrance, will the bees all march into the hive?

    I’m not sure if there is any benefit in doing it like that….. or any downside. Just curious.

    Robert in the hills of Tennessee
     
  2. DCoates

    DCoates New Member

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    Possibly... Ask yourself, "what's the goal?" If it's to be more gentle to the bees sure it might work. It might have unforseen negative consequences. It all depends on what you're hoping to accomplish.

    I'm a huge fan of get in and get out. It seems like doing it this way will take more time.
     

  3. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    If you are looking for an easier way, remove five outer frames. Set the shipping cage in their place. Install queen between frames. Open shipping cage top. Walk away. Open hive the following day and remove cage.Replace frames.

    PS. Welcome to the forum.
     
  4. n5odj

    n5odj New Member

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    OK, reckon I'll just do it the same way as before.... dump them in the top. I've not had any problems doing it that way, but was just curious if the other way would work. I suspect it would work though.

    Robert
     
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I suspect it would work.

    At the price of a package, I don't think I would want to pay for the experiment if it did not.
     
  6. CentralPAGuy

    CentralPAGuy New Member

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    Last year, I installed 13 packages in a yard by shaking them out and a huge amount of bees went down to the hives at my ends to make their home. I have another 10 packages on order and I am thinking of installing them the gentle way if only to keep the bees in their homes. Don't know if that will work or not
     
  7. n5odj

    n5odj New Member

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    CentralPAGuy, do you mean letting them march in after the queen or placing the whole crate into the hive?

    Oh, and BTW, Tecumseh, where in central TX are you? I used to live in Lockhart & then Austin. Grew up outside of San Antonio, but I reckon east Tennessee is home now.

    Robert
     
  8. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper New Member

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    I do not like the bang shake package install. My drummer beats a different tune.First I get the hive(s) set in place where I am going to install packages. I also have all the tools needed and helmit and veil. Tools are a mister bottle with 1:1 syrup to spray the girls in the package with, A hive tool or small pry bar to get the packages lid off with. I like small channel locks to grab the syrup can out of the package with.
    [​IMG]

    In this picture I have already installed the package on the right. the second deep just surrounds the package, syrup can and syrup jar. But is shows the mister bottle and pry bar I use.
    [​IMG]

    This is what the
    package looks like from the side and where you really mist them down with syrup both sides.

    [​IMG]

    This is the top of the package with the lid still in place. The white strap is hooked and holding the queen cage in place.

    [​IMG]

    This is the package with the lid loose, the syrup can and queen cage removed. I repace the lid after doing the removal. The girls are still busy cleaning the syrup off each other from the misting.

    [​IMG]


    :mrgreen: Al
     
  9. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper New Member

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    This is the queen cage with some burr comb on it. I was told this package was only 3 days old when I picked it up and did the install the 4th day.
    Remove the cork from the candy end only. Since I'm installing the package in drawn comb I place the cage candy end up between two frames and squeeze them together to hold it in place. You will see the gap in a different picture.

    [​IMG]

    This shows the gap in the frames I left for the queen cage. Once I have that in I hold the lid on the package and turn it upside down over the frames and pull out the lid just before it touches the frames.

    [​IMG]

    I place the syrup can on the frames if there is any left. I also set a gallon of syrup on the top bars too.
    once that is done I set a second deep body around it all. I come back in a couple of days and remove the empty package and place a intercover on with the syrup jar on top of that. The can is usally empty by then. During the cheap fuel days (diesel at 1.35 a gallon) we did the package removal in a couple of hours. today we go back in about 4 days when the queen should be loose.

    [​IMG]

    These colonies are at a tree nursery along a river. We had a lot of trouble with coons so they have upper entrances only plus they do use the vent holes a lot too.

    :mrgreen: Al
     
  10. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper New Member

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    Some pictures from a install on foundation.
    The cork end of the queen cage and small finish nails to hold the cage on the top frame bars.

    [​IMG]

    Removing the package lid as the package is near the frame top bars.

    [​IMG]

    This cage is called a JZBZ cage and are what we buy for our own use as I like them better to get the new queen in than the Benton cage.
    This one holds only the queen.
    I also like them because they fit between the frames better.

    [​IMG]

    One thing I do not do is poke a hole in the candy of the queen cage. with Itialian queens I never had a problem doing that. BUTI lose 5 of 6 carnie queens the first time doing that. the second time I lost all 5 of the queens. In fact one hive I opened just in time to see the girls balling the queen. Seens the hive doesn't like to accept carnie queens as soon.

    Now days we do not buy packages or Nucs any longer. We raise our own Queens for the most part or I'll get a few expermintal queen to try. I like to get them laying right away so release the queen on a frame of drawn comb lightly misted with syrup so she doesn't run fast. I'll alread have my home made push in cage in place except for one end where the queen goes in. Once she is in I push the open end close.
    She will normally start laying in a day or so and have the whole area full in 4 days when i remove the push in cage.

    [​IMG]

    We install the queen cages candy end up. Club members are about 60% thast way. In the Benton cage with workers in it some times a worker dies and has the hole blocked so the queen still isn't out in 6 days.

    :mrgreen: Al
     
  11. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    Hello,
    What I have always done, to avoid having the accumulation of dead bees in the bottom of the cage from being dumped into the colony, is firstly install the queen in a conventional manner, shake a decent ball of bees to cover her, this is with all 10 frames in the hive body, next I used a towel or babies blankey and extended it to the bottom board and entrance and dumped the rest of the bees out, there will already have bees " scenting in the entrance, more will take up this same posture to " call in the rest of the troops--lets build a nest ". They will march right in, leaving all the debris and dead bees outside for the most part. Of course prior to this I will have sprayed the bees with sugar syrup, operating under the assumption the can of syrup sent with them will be empty or nearly so, also keeps the bees busy cleaning themselves, and intaking the syrup. alot less flying much more crawling.