Divider Boards for Langstroth nucs

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Adam Foster Collins, Sep 17, 2012.

  1. Adam Foster Collins

    Adam Foster Collins New Member

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    I'm thinking about constructing some divider boards for use in Langstroth Deeps.

    I have been looking at Mike Palmer's double deep, four frame nucs, and thinking ahead to next year. I am also building more gear this winter, and thinking about how to handle things.

    So I'm wondering about making divider boards, which I could use to divide deeps in order to make nucs. I guess they would have to be done well enough to be able to stack them and still have them match up solidly.

    Do any of you have any advice on these? Are there ways to construct them so that they come apart easier? Match up easier? Or is it a bad idea all around?

    Thanks,

    Adam
     
  2. bee stung

    bee stung New Member

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    I have thought about doing the same ,,, but i have the feeling it would not do what/how I want so I plan to try another way next year ,, and hope it goes the way I want ,, but I will try wintering 2 nucs next winter ..
     

  3. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    I brought two 5-frames nucs through last winter in one 10 frame deep box, with two entrances and a plastic divider in the middle...the kind you buy ready made. It didn't fit perfectly but with an adjustment or two, seemed to keep them separate. Since the plastic divider was thin, I could still get 10 frames into the box- 5 on each side.
    It was a bit problematic in the Spring, to remove a nuc and leave the other colony in, because you couldn't shake out the pile of bees in the bottom of the box after removing 5 frames.
    I think next time I will just leave them in sep. nuc boxes and maybe wrap a piece of tarpaper around two nucs at a time.
     
  4. Minz

    Minz Member

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    If your building the boxes then rip the slots before you assemble (all at the same time). I made the mistake of fitting mine too tight (always do) and sometimes I really need to reef on them to get them out. If the boxes are existing line them up flush, use a straight board for a fence (my circular saw cuts 1 ¼†from the fence) rip them all the same time. Add a 1/8†spacer (same as the blade width known as the kerf) do it again. That should give you a ¼†slot for the boards that lines up exact. My ¼†stock is less than that. I got some ‘Queen Castle’ plans that I followed (free somewhere on line).
     
  5. Adam Foster Collins

    Adam Foster Collins New Member

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    I feel like I'd rather have a free moving divider, that hangs from the frame rests, instead of something that fits in a slot. That way, I can size freely to whatever I need.

    Adam
     
  6. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    Adam, you just have to keep in mind that the top of the divider has to actually butt all the way up against the underside of the inner cover, to keep the bees from walking back and forth between colonies. Thus, the divider needs to have a higher crown profile than the tops of the frames. Much easier if the inner cover is totally flat, for sure! Watch out if ther'es a center hole in the inner cover- might want to screen it flush.
     
  7. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I don't do this so much any more since I went to 5 frame nucs but I use to take very old deteriorating boxes and use double backed foil backed foam board and construct something along the lines of what you are talking about. a bit of canvas to drape over the top allowed you to work one side at a time. most of the time I found limiting each side to 4 frames helped in any manipulation.
     
  8. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    Divider board is not listed in the Glossary in Beekeeping 101.

    A newbee or a non-US beekeeper may have difficulty with this thread.

    Does anyone advocate having ventilation holes in the divider board ?
     
  9. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    The commercial sliding plastic divider boards I have do have little 'vent' slatted areas that you can open and close- not big enough for bees to pass thru.
     
  10. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    If your keeping nuc for a source of readily available queens opening the vent holes once a queen is pulled then pulling divider board to unite bees yes. For over winter no vent so no transfer of pheromones.
    Movable divider boards have to be long enough to span from the top of box to the bottom board and have no spaces for bees to get around. but to use to confine the bees in a smaller space in a hive they work great. I have used with mutable slots at 1/3, 1/2, and 2/3 the way across the box so com use for 2) - 4 frame or 3) - 3 frame. Built narrower feeders so could fit 4 frame and in hive feeder the 3 frame setting was used for mating nucs 2 frames and a feeder. Built the boxes with cleats on the end instead of dado-ed hand holds